EMS Safety

 

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EMS Safety

Move Over Laws Aren't Enough To Keep Responders Safe At The Roadside

Submitted by Bill Degnan on Fri, 02/07/2020 - 17:01

Sure, it's the law that you have to move over (and/or slow down) when emergency vehicles are stopped at the roadside. But lives are still being lost while we're trying to save others.

There ought to be a law. And there are. Plenty of them. But why is that not enough?

“I’ll be Okay; I can Handle It” First Responder’s response to Stress

Submitted by Jonathon Walker on Wed, 01/29/2020 - 21:35

In order for one to become certified as a first medical responder such as a Paramedic, a student must be instructed through an institution, such as a college or fire department, and must learn objectives that meet the current standards of care. Those standards include care for someone having a heart attack, stroke, has been involved in an automobile accident and so on. During that training, there is a chapter labeled “Wellness of the EMT.” Within this chapter is a very small section that pertains to the Paramedic taking care of themselves when they are not taking care of patients.

Leadership In The Line Of Fire
File Photo Source: FEMA
File Photo Source: FEMA

No one ever expects tragedy to happen, and yet tragedy has and will continue to happen every day to someone. When tragedy does happen, those involved look for someone to take charge and be a leader.

Jonathon Walker Thu, 01/23/2020 - 11:17

Manage Scene Lighting For Safety

Submitted by Bill Degnan on Sun, 01/12/2020 - 01:23

Maybe there's too much LED and Xenon light on scene -- potentially blinding or distracting motorists. Too much red. Not enough amber. You drive where you LOOK!

There are recommendations I have read, that would drastically reduce warning lights, once traffic control is established.

Please take a moment and read the linked presentation.

I-95 Corridor Coalition › Gui...PDF
WARNING LIGHTS, PARKING and SCENE SAFETY 
https://i95coalition.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/Guide_Clear_RF.pdf%onscene.us

If EMS Was In The Construction Industry

Submitted by Bill Degnan on Tue, 01/07/2020 - 20:13

An advantage to having come to EMS from a Construction background is that one can view safety from a different perspective. In EMS, the paperwork is after action. In Construction, it is said that when the weight of the paperwork exceeds that of the project, the construction phase may begin. No less true for construction safety. Before a task can begin, a Job Hazard Analysis must be produced and approved and it is briefed with the workers before any new phase of work. Over the years, some of us assembled our own version of "The JHA From Hell".