Emergency Management News - Maine

 

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Drought Conditions Worsen Across Maine As Little Precipitation Is Expected

20 hours 38 minutes ago
AUGUSTA, MAINE -Maine's Drought Task Force met virtually today to discuss the worsening drought conditions across the state. Since the Task Force met two weeks ago, more than 56% of the State is now under severe drought conditions. Conditions in parts of Aroostook County have fallen into extreme drought conditions, prompting the Small Business Association to enact a drought declaration for Aroostook County. The Drought Declaration enables applicants across Aroostook and the contiguous counties of Penobscot, Washington, Piscataquis, and Somerset to submit to SBA's Economic Injury Disaster Loans program.

"Below normal rainfall is expected over the next seven days, which could worsen drought conditions in western and northern Maine," Tom Hawley of the National Weather Service said.

There are currently no mandatory conservation measures, though some are voluntarily conserving. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Drinking Water Program (DWP) and MEMA have received several reports of dry wells.

"With little to no relief in sight, we encourage anyone experiencing a dry well to report it via our Dry Well Survey," said MEMA Director Peter Rogers.

MEMA launched the Dry">https://survey123.arcgis.com/share/49fef6c94fd34a6a9804175ae4a3ad93?portalUrl=https://maine.maps.arcgis.com">Dry Well Survey last month and has received some feedback of dry wells in Somerset, Waldo, Sagadahoc, Penobscot, Kennebec, Franklin, Knox and Washington Counties. The reported wells range between drilled and dug wells used for residential, irrigation, livestock, and/or "other" purposes. Anyone wishing to complete the survey without internet access can call 2-1-1. Completing the survey does not guarantee any type of assistance but helps the Task Force determine how widespread the problem may be and what resources may be needed.

The U.S. Geological Survey reported that surface water levels are worsening statewide, nearing record low levels during what is already the lowest period of the year, while ground water levels are receding, and slowly worsening.

The USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA) reported a continued impact to most crops across the state, especially in Aroostook County, noting that special FSA">https://www.usda.gov/topics/disaster/drought/usda-drought-programs-and-assistance">FSA Farm Programs have been triggered to assist farmers, ranchers and small businesses as the drought continues. The Small">https://disasterloan.sba.gov/ela">Small Business Administration also reported a declaration of disaster, prompting the availability for disaster loan assistance. The FSA Farm Programs automatically trigger once a county has been at D2 drought status for eight consecutive weeks or immediately upon hitting D3 status for any length of time, as reported weekly by the U.S.">http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu">U.S. Drought Monitor. Programs available are:

- Livestock">https://www.fsa.usda.gov/Assets/USDA-FSA-Public/usdafiles/FactSheets/livestock_forage_program_lfp-fact_sheet.pdf">Livestock Forage Program (LFP) - provides payments to livestock producer for grazing losses - Emergency">https://www.fsa.usda.gov/Assets/USDA-FSA-Public/usdafiles/FactSheets/archived-fact-sheets/elap-livestock-fact-sheet_11-22-19.pdf">Emergency Livestock Assistance Program (ELAP) - provides financial assistance to livestock producers for losses resulting from the additional cost of transporting water to livestock due to an eligible drought - Emergency">https://www.fsa.usda.gov/Assets/USDA-FSA-Public/usdafiles/FactSheets/emergency-conservation-program-ecp-fact_sheet.pdf">Emergency Conservation Program (ECP) provides cost share to provide emergency water during periods of severe drought (specifically for grazing and confined livestock and existing irrigation systems for orchards and vineyards) - Non-insurable">https://www.fsa.usda.gov/Assets/USDA-FSA-Public/usdafiles/FactSheets/noninsured_crop_disaster_assistance_program-nap-fact_sheet.pdf">Non-insurable Crop Assistance Program (NAP) - acts like crop insurance but is for non-insurable crops and covers drought related losses. In this case, the crop loss acts as the trigger for the program.

Citizens who may be experiencing low water levels in wells are also encouraged to take the following steps:

- Avoid filling wells by a water hauler or fire department. This could contaminate the owner's well because water from an unknown source may contain toxins and water would likely leak out in a short amount of time.

- Check water systems for leaks and fix them. This can also save money for those on public water.

- Ensure you have a full load before running dishwashers and washing machines.

- Space out water usage to avoid a temporary shortage that could damage the pump.

- If using drinking water from an outside source, make sure containers and the water source are clean.

- Use a licensed well driller or pump installer to check water levels in wells for the most accurate assessment and advice and to avoid contamination.

The Drought Task Force is made up of state, federal and private scientific, agricultural, regulatory, water use and natural resources organizations and assists in monitoring, coordinating, and managing responses to droughts and recommends actions to minimize impacts to public health, safety, the environment and agriculture.

The Task Force will continue to monitor the situation and plans to convene again in two weeks, or sooner, if needed.

Drought Conditions Worsen Across Maine As Little Precipitation Is Expected

4 days 17 hours ago
AUGUSTA, MAINE -Maine's Drought Task Force met virtually today to discuss the worsening drought conditions across the state. Since the Task Force met two weeks ago, more than 56% of the State is now under severe drought conditions. Conditions in parts of Aroostook County have fallen into extreme drought conditions, prompting the Small Business Association to enact a drought declaration for Aroostook County. The Drought Declaration enables applicants across Aroostook and the contiguous counties of Penobscot, Washington, Piscataquis, and Somerset to submit to SBA's Economic Injury Disaster Loans program.

"Below normal rainfall is expected over the next seven days, which could worsen drought conditions in western and northern Maine," Tom Hawley of the National Weather Service said.

There are currently no mandatory conservation measures, though some are voluntarily conserving. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Drinking Water Program (DWP) and MEMA have received several reports of dry wells.

With little to no relief in sight, we encourage anyone experiencing a dry well to report it via our Dry Well Survey, said MEMA Director Peter Rogers.

MEMA launched the Dry">https://survey123.arcgis.com/share/49fef6c94fd34a6a9804175ae4a3ad93?portalUrl=https://maine.maps.arcgis.com">Dry Well Survey last month and has received some feedback of dry wells in Somerset, Waldo, Sagadahoc, Penobscot, Kennebec, Franklin, Knox and Washington Counties. The reported wells range between drilled and dug wells used for residential, irrigation, livestock, and/or "other" purposes. Anyone wishing to complete the survey without internet access can call 2-1-1. Completing the survey does not guarantee any type of assistance but helps the Task Force determine how widespread the problem may be and what resources may be needed.

The U.S. Geological Survey reported that surface water levels are worsening statewide, nearing record low levels during what is already the lowest period of the year, while ground water levels are receding, and slowly worsening.

The USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA) reported a continued impact to most crops across the state, especially in Aroostook County, noting that special FSA">https://www.usda.gov/topics/disaster/drought/usda-drought-programs-and-assistance">FSA Farm Programs have been triggered to assist farmers, ranchers and small businesses as the drought continues. The Small">https://disasterloan.sba.gov/ela">Small Business Administration also reported a declaration of disaster, prompting the availability for disaster loan assistance. The FSA Farm Programs automatically trigger once a county has been at D2 drought status for eight consecutive weeks or immediately upon hitting D3 status for any length of time, as reported weekly by the U.S.">http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu">U.S. Drought Monitor. Programs available are:

- Livestock">https://www.fsa.usda.gov/Assets/USDA-FSA-Public/usdafiles/FactSheets/livestock_forage_program_lfp-fact_sheet.pdf">Livestock Forage Program (LFP) - provides payments to livestock producer for grazing losses - Emergency">https://www.fsa.usda.gov/Assets/USDA-FSA-Public/usdafiles/FactSheets/archived-fact-sheets/elap-livestock-fact-sheet_11-22-19.pdf">Emergency Livestock Assistance Program (ELAP) - provides financial assistance to livestock producers for losses resulting from the additional cost of transporting water to livestock due to an eligible drought - Emergency">https://www.fsa.usda.gov/Assets/USDA-FSA-Public/usdafiles/FactSheets/emergency-conservation-program-ecp-fact_sheet.pdf">Emergency Conservation Program (ECP) provides cost share to provide emergency water during periods of severe drought (specifically for grazing and confined livestock and existing irrigation systems for orchards and vineyards) - Non-insurable">https://www.fsa.usda.gov/Assets/USDA-FSA-Public/usdafiles/FactSheets/noninsured_crop_disaster_assistance_program-nap-fact_sheet.pdf">Non-insurable Crop Assistance Program (NAP) - acts like crop insurance but is for non-insurable crops and covers drought related losses. In this case, the crop loss acts as the trigger for the program.

Citizens who may be experiencing low water levels in wells are also encouraged to take the following steps:

- Avoid filling wells by a water hauler or fire department. This could contaminate the owner's well because water from an unknown source may contain toxins and water would likely leak out in a short amount of time.

- Check water systems for leaks and fix them. This can also save money for those on public water.

- Ensure you have a full load before running dishwashers and washing machines.

- Space out water usage to avoid a temporary shortage that could damage the pump.

- If using drinking water from an outside source, make sure containers and the water source are clean.

- Use a licensed well driller or pump installer to check water levels in wells for the most accurate assessment and advice and to avoid contamination.

The Drought Task Force is made up of state, federal and private scientific, agricultural, regulatory, water use and natural resources organizations and assists in monitoring, coordinating, and managing responses to droughts and recommends actions to minimize impacts to public health, safety, the environment and agriculture.

The Task Force will continue to monitor the situation and plans to convene again in two weeks, or sooner, if needed.

Drought Conditions Worsen Across Maine As Little Precipitation Is Expected

4 days 18 hours ago
AUGUSTA, MAINE -Maine's Drought Task Force met virtually today to discuss the worsening drought conditions across the state. Since the Task Force met two weeks ago, more than 56% of the State is now under severe drought conditions. Conditions in parts of Aroostook County have fallen into extreme drought conditions, prompting the Small Business Association to enact a drought declaration.

"Below normal rainfall is expected over the next seven days, which could worsen drought conditions in western and northern Maine," Tom Hawley of the National Weather Service said.

There are currently no mandatory conservation measures, though some are voluntarily conserving. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Drinking Water Program (DWP) has received several reports of dry wells.

With little to no relief in sight, we encourage anyone experiencing a dry well to report it via our Dry Well Survey, said MEMA Director Peter Rogers.

MEMA launched the Dry">https://survey123.arcgis.com/share/49fef6c94fd34a6a9804175ae4a3ad93?portalUrl=https://maine.maps.arcgis.com">Dry Well Survey two weeks ago and has received some feedback of dry wells in Somerset, Waldo and Washington Counties. The reported wells are residential, dug wells. Anyone wishing to complete the survey without internet access can call 2-1-1. Completing the survey does not guarantee any type of assistance but helps the Task Force determine how widespread the problem may be and what resources may be needed.

The U.S. Geological Survey reported that surface water levels are worsening statewide, nearing record low levels during what is already the lowest period of the year, while ground water levels are receding, and slowly worsening.

The USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA) reported a continued impact to most crops across the state, especially in Aroostook County, noting that special FSA">https://www.usda.gov/topics/disaster/drought/usda-drought-programs-and-assistance">FSA Farm Programs have been triggered to assist farmers, ranchers and small businesses as the drought continues. The Small">https://disasterloan.sba.gov/ela">Small Business Administration also reported a declaration of disaster, prompting the availability for disaster loan assistance.

Citizens who may be experiencing low water levels in wells are also encouraged to take the following steps:

- Avoid filling wells by a water hauler or fire department. This could contaminate the owner's well because water from an unknown source may contain toxins and water would likely leak out in a short amount of time.

- Check water systems for leaks and fix them. This can also save money for those on public water.

- Ensure you have a full load before running dishwashers and washing machines.

- Space out water usage to avoid a temporary shortage that could damage the pump.

- If using drinking water from an outside source, make sure containers and the water source are clean.

- Use a licensed well driller or pump installer to check water levels in wells for the most accurate assessment and advice and to avoid contamination.

The Drought Task Force is made up of state, federal and private scientific, agricultural, regulatory, water use and natural resources organizations and assists in monitoring, coordinating, and managing responses to droughts and recommends actions to minimize impacts to public health, safety, the environment and agriculture.

The Task Force will continue to monitor the situation and plans to convene again in two weeks, or sooner, if needed.

State Emergency Response Commission Meeting Minutes for January 2020

1 week 6 days ago
The State Emergency Response Commission (SERC) held their regular meeting January 14th, 2020.

Meeting minutes are linked below.

The SERC meets quarterly and all meetings are open to members of the public. If you plan to attend a meeting, please contact MEMA at least 24 hours in advance to confirm the meeting will take place as scheduled. If you have any questions or would like to attend a meeting, please call (207) 624-4400.

Drought Task Force Meets: Conditions Remain Dry Across Maine with Little Precipitation Expected

2 weeks 4 days ago
AUGUSTA, MAINE - Maine's Drought Task Force met virtually today to discuss the worsening drought conditions across the state. Since the Task Force met two weeks ago, much of the state is experiencing moderate to severe drought conditions, though Northern Aroostook County has seen a slight improvement with some localized rain.

"Conditions may worsen over the next seven days statewide due to below normal rainfall and a continued trend of above normal temperatures," Tom Hawley of the National Weather Service said.

The Maine Department of Health and Human Services, Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Drinking Water Program (DWP) and Water and Wastewater Agency Response Network (WARN), reported receiving reports from public water systems experiencing drought-related water quantity and quality issues statewide. Several public water systems are taking steps to modify operations to accommodate low water, and some have requested that their customers participate in voluntary water conservation measures.

We continue to encourage anyone experiencing a dry well to report it via our Dry Well Survey, said MEMA Deputy Director Joe Legee.

MEMA launched the Dry">https://survey123.arcgis.com/share/49fef6c94fd34a6a9804175ae4a3ad93?portalUrl=https://maine.maps.arcgis.com">Dry Well Survey two weeks ago and has received some feedback of dry wells in Somerset, Waldo and Washington Counties. The reported wells are residential, dug wells. Anyone wishing to complete the survey without internet access can call 2-1-1. Completing the survey does not guarantee any type of assistance but helps the Task Force determine how widespread the problem may be and what resources may be needed.

The U.S. Geological Survey reported that the recent rain provided a slight improvement to surface water levels in Aroostook County and parts of Downeast Maine. Ground water levels remain unchanged, especially in Aroostook County, prompting the Maine Department of Environmental Protection to issue an irrigation">https://www.maine.gov/dep/news/news.html?id=3157594">irrigation warning.

The USDA Farm Service Agency reported a continued impact to most crops across the state, including potatoes, blueberries and cover crops and noted irrigation issues, especially in Aroostook County. The USDA">https://www.usda.gov/topics/disaster/drought/usda-drought-programs-and-assistance">USDA is taking steps to assist farmers, ranchers and small businesses as the drought continues.

Citizens who may be experiencing low water levels in wells are also encouraged to take the following steps:

- Avoid filling wells by a water hauler or fire department. This could contaminate the owner's well because water from an unknown source may contain toxins and water would likely leak out in a short amount of time.

- Check water systems for leaks and fix them. This can also save money for those on public water.

- Ensure you have a full load before running dishwashers and washing machines.

- Space out water usage to avoid a temporary shortage that could damage the pump.

- If using drinking water from an outside source, make sure containers and the water source are clean.

- Use a licensed well driller or pump installer to check water levels in wells for the most accurate assessment and advice and to avoid contamination.

The Drought Task Force is made up of state, federal and private scientific, agricultural, regulatory, water use and natural resources organizations and assists in monitoring, coordinating, and managing responses to droughts and recommends actions to minimize impacts to public health, safety, the environment and agriculture.

The Task Force will continue to monitor the situation and plans to convene again in two weeks, or sooner, if needed.

Drought Task Force Meets: Conditions Worsen Across Maine With Little Relief in Sight

1 month ago
AUGUSTA, MAINE -Maine's Drought Task Force convened today by virtual meeting, to discuss the worsening drought conditions across the state. Since the Task Force met two weeks ago, the area considered to be in severe drought has grown to 42 percent of the state and now includes portions of Penobscot, Piscataquis, Somerset and Washington Counties in addition to Aroostook County, which has been in severe drought for more than 7 weeks.

"We will continue to monitor conditions and convene in two weeks, or sooner, if need be," said MEMA Director Peter Rogers. Meanwhile, we encourage anyone with a dry well to report it via our Dry Well Survey.

MEMA launched the Dry">https://survey123.arcgis.com/share/49fef6c94fd34a6a9804175ae4a3ad93?portalUrl=https://maine.maps.arcgis.com">Dry Well Survey two weeks ago and has received some feedback of dry wells in Somerset, Waldo and Washington Counties. The reported wells are residential, dug wells. Anyone wishing to complete the survey without internet access can call 2-1-1. Completing the survey does not guarantee any type of assistance but helps the Task Force determine how widespread the problem may be and what resources may be needed.

The U.S. Geological Survey reports that ground water levels are dropping steadily and surface water levels have worsened slightly over the last two weeks.

The National Weather Service reports that conditions could worsen over the next seven days, but the 6-10-day forecast shows above-normal precipitation and temperatures in the normal to below normal range.

The Maine Department of Health and Human Services, Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Drinking Water Program (DWP) is receiving reports from public water systems experiencing drought-related water quantity issues statewide. Public water systems continue to take steps to modify operations to accommodate low water. Some systems have requested that their customers participate in voluntary water conservation measures.

The USDA Farm Service Agency reported an impact to most crops across the state, including potatoes, hay, oats, barley, blueberries and cover crops. In addition, some farmers report having to sell off cattle early due to the lack of hay. Some farms report that they are struggling to keep up with irrigation needs. The USDA">https://www.usda.gov/topics/disaster/drought/usda-drought-programs-and-assistance">USDA is taking steps to assist farmers, ranchers and small businesses as the drought continues.

Citizens who may be experiencing low water levels in wells are also encouraged to take the following steps:

- Avoid filling wells by a water hauler or fire department. This could contaminate the owner's well because water from an unknown source may contain toxins and water would likely leak out in a short amount of time.

- Check water systems for leaks and fix them. This can also save money for those on public water.

- Ensure you have a full load before running dishwashers and washing machines.

- Space out water usage to avoid a temporary shortage that could damage the pump.

- If using drinking water from an outside source, make sure containers and the water source are clean.

- Use a licensed well driller or pump installer to check water levels in wells for the most accurate assessment and advice and to avoid contamination.

The Drought Task Force is made up of state, federal and private scientific, agricultural, regulatory, water use and natural resources organizations and assists in monitoring, coordinating, and managing responses to droughts and recommends actions to minimize impacts to public health, safety, the environment and agriculture.

The Task Force will continue to monitor the situation and plans to convene again in two weeks, or sooner, if needed.

State Drought Conditions Continue for Sixth Week Across Maine

1 month ago
State Drought Conditions Continue for Sixth Week Across Maine AUGUSTA, MAINE -Maine's Drought Task Force convened today by virtual meeting, as drought conditions continue across the state for a sixth week. The Task Force met two weeks ago and since then there has been little change to the ongoing drought across Maine.

The U.S. Geological Survey reports that ground water and streamflow levels have improved slightly due to recent rain, but there has been no significant long-term recovery and continued dry conditions will likely cause ground and surface water levels to decrease over the next few weeks.

The National Weather Service reports that lower than normal precipitation and higher than normal temperatures are expected over the next two weeks and drought conditions could worsen during that time.

The Maine Department of Health and Human Services, Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Drinking Water Program (DWP) continues to monitor hydrologic conditions statewide. Some public drinking water systems report that they are currently taking steps to modify operations to accommodate low water. The Maine Public Utilities Commission reported that some water utilities are implementing voluntary conservation measures.

The USDA Farm Service Agency reported a decrease in hay crops this year and widespread use of irrigation in many counties, especially Aroostook County where severe drought conditions exist.

The Maine Emergency Management Agency (MEMA) is launching a Dry">https://survey123.arcgis.com/share/49fef6c94fd34a6a9804175ae4a3ad93?portalUrl=https://maine.maps.arcgis.com">Dry Well Survey today to help determine the number of dry wells across the state. Anyone experiencing a dry well can complete the survey online. Those without computer access may call 2-1-1 to report dry wells. Reporting this information is not a guarantee of assistance but helps gauge how widespread the problem is and what resources might be needed.

Citizens who may be experiencing low water levels in wells are also encouraged to take the following steps:

- Avoid filling wells by a water hauler or fire department. This could contaminate the owner's well because water from an unknown source may contain toxins and water would likely leak out in a short amount of time.

- Check water systems for leaks and fix them. This can also save money for those on public water.

- Ensure you have a full load before running dishwashers and washing machines.

- Space out water usage to avoid a temporary shortage that could damage the pump.

- If using drinking water from an outside source, make sure containers and the water source are clean.

- Use a licensed well driller or pump installer to check water levels in wells for the most accurate assessment and advice and to avoid contamination.

The Drought Task Force is made up of state, federal and private scientific, agricultural, regulatory, water use and natural resources organizations and assists in monitoring, coordinating, and managing responses to droughts and recommends actions to minimize impacts to public health, safety, the environment and agriculture.

The Task Force will continue to monitor the situation and plans to convene again in two weeks.

State Emergency Response Commission Meeting Minutes for January 2020

1 month 1 week ago
The State Emergency Response Commission (SERC) held their regular meeting January 14th, 2020.

Meeting minutes are linked below.

The SERC meets quarterly and all meetings are open to members of the public. If you plan to attend a meeting, please contact MEMA at least 24 hours in advance to confirm the meeting will take place as scheduled. If you have any questions or would like to attend a meeting, please call (207) 624-4400.

State Drought Conditions Continue for Sixth Week Across Maine

1 month 2 weeks ago
State Drought Conditions Continue for Sixth Week Across Maine AUGUSTA, MAINE -Maine's Drought Task Force convened today by virtual meeting, as drought conditions continue across the state for a sixth week. The Task Force met two weeks ago and since then there has been little change to the ongoing drought across Maine.

The U.S. Geological Survey reports that ground water and streamflow levels have improved slightly due to recent rain, but there has been no significant long-term recovery and continued dry conditions will likely cause ground and surface water levels to decrease over the next few weeks.

The National Weather Service reports that lower than normal precipitation and higher than normal temperatures are expected over the next two weeks and drought conditions could worsen during that time.

The Maine Department of Health and Human Services, Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Drinking Water Program (DWP) continues to monitor hydrologic conditions statewide. Some public drinking water systems report that they are currently taking steps to modify operations to accommodate low water. The Maine Public Utilities Commission reported that some water utilities are implementing voluntary conservation measures.

The USDA Farm Service Agency reported a decrease in hay crops this year and widespread use of irrigation in many counties, especially Aroostook County where severe drought conditions exist.

The Maine Emergency Management Agency (MEMA) is launching a Dry">https://survey123.arcgis.com/share/49fef6c94fd34a6a9804175ae4a3ad93?portalUrl=https://maine.maps.arcgis.com">Dry Well Survey today to help determine the number of dry wells across the state. Anyone experiencing a dry well can complete the survey online. Those without computer access may call 2-1-1 to report dry wells. Reporting this information is not a guarantee of assistance but helps gauge how widespread the problem is and what resources might be needed.

Citizens who may be experiencing low water levels in wells are also encouraged to take the following steps:

- Avoid filling wells by a water hauler or fire department. This could contaminate the owner's well because water from an unknown source may contain toxins and water would likely leak out in a short amount of time.

- Check water systems for leaks and fix them. This can also save money for those on public water.

- Ensure you have a full load before running dishwashers and washing machines.

- Space out water usage to avoid a temporary shortage that could damage the pump.

- If using drinking water from an outside source, make sure containers and the water source are clean.

- Use a licensed well driller or pump installer to check water levels in wells for the most accurate assessment and advice and to avoid contamination.

The Drought Task Force is made up of state, federal and private scientific, agricultural, regulatory, water use and natural resources organizations and assists in monitoring, coordinating, and managing responses to droughts and recommends actions to minimize impacts to public health, safety, the environment and agriculture.

The Task Force will continue to monitor the situation and plans to convene again in two weeks.

State Drought Conditions Continue for Sixth Week Across Maine

1 month 2 weeks ago
State Drought Conditions Continue for Sixth Week Across Maine AUGUSTA, MAINE -Maine's Drought Task Force convened today by virtual meeting, as drought conditions continue across the state for a sixth week. The Task Force met two weeks ago and since then there has been little change to the ongoing drought across Maine.

The U.S. Geological Survey reports that ground water and streamflow levels have improved slightly due to recent rain, but there has been no significant long-term recovery and continued dry conditions will likely cause ground and surface water levels to decrease over the next few weeks.

The National Weather Service reports that lower than normal precipitation and higher than normal temperatures are expected over the next two weeks and drought conditions could worsen during that time.

The Maine Department of Health and Human Services, Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Drinking Water Program (DWP) continues to monitor hydrologic conditions statewide. Some public drinking water systems report that they are currently taking steps to modify operations to accommodate low water. The Maine Public Utilities Commission reported that some water utilities are implementing voluntary conservation measures.

The USDA Farm Service Agency reported a decrease in hay crops this year and widespread use of irrigation in many counties, especially Aroostook County where severe drought conditions exist.

The Maine Emergency Management Agency (MEMA) is launching a Dry">https://survey123.arcgis.com/share/49fef6c94fd34a6a9804175ae4a3ad93?portalUrl=https://maine.maps.arcgis.com">Dry Well Survey today to help determine the number of dry wells across the state. Anyone experiencing a dry well can complete the survey online. Those without computer access may call 2-1-1 to report dry wells. Reporting this information is not a guarantee of assistance but helps gauge how widespread the problem is and what resources might be needed. Citizens who may be experiencing low water levels in wells are also encouraged to take the following steps:

- Avoid filling wells by a water hauler or fire department. This could contaminate the owner's well because water from an unknown source may contain toxins and water would likely leak out in a short amount of time.

- Check water systems for leaks and fix them. This can also save money for those on public water.

- Ensure you have a full load before running dishwashers and washing machines.

- Space out water usage to avoid a temporary shortage that could damage the pump.

- If using drinking water from an outside source, make sure containers and the water source are clean.

- Use a licensed well driller or pump installer to check water levels in wells for the most accurate assessment and advice and to avoid contamination.

The Drought Task Force is made up of state, federal and private scientific, agricultural, regulatory, water use and natural resources organizations and assists in monitoring, coordinating, and managing responses to droughts and recommends actions to minimize impacts to public health, safety, the environment and agriculture.

The Task Force will continue to monitor the situation and plans to convene again in two weeks.

State Drought Conditions Continue for Sixth Week Across Maine

1 month 2 weeks ago
State Drought Conditions Continue for Sixth Week Across Maine AUGUSTA, MAINE -Maine's Drought Task Force convened today by virtual meeting, as drought conditions continue across the state for a sixth week. The Task Force met two weeks ago and since then there has been little change to the ongoing drought across Maine.

The U.S. Geological Survey reports that ground water and streamflow levels have improved slightly due to recent rain, but there has been no significant long-term recovery and continued dry conditions will likely cause ground and surface water levels to decrease over the next few weeks.

The National Weather Service reports that lower than normal precipitation and higher than normal temperatures are expected over the next two weeks and drought conditions could worsen during that time.

The Maine Department of Health and Human Services, Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Drinking Water Program (DWP) continues to monitor hydrologic conditions statewide. Some public drinking water systems report that they are currently taking steps to modify operations to accommodate low water. The Maine Public Utilities Commission reported that some water utilities are implementing voluntary conservation measures.

The USDA Farm Service Agency reported a decrease in hay crops this year and widespread use of irrigation in many counties, especially Aroostook County where severe drought conditions exist.

The Maine Emergency Management Agency (MEMA) is launching a Dry Well Survey today to help determine the number of dry wells across the state. Anyone experiencing a dry well can complete the survey online. Those without computer access may call 2-1-1 to report dry wells. Reporting this information is not a guarantee of assistance but helps gauge how widespread the problem is and what resources might be needed. Citizens who may be experiencing low water levels in wells are also encouraged to take the following steps:

- Avoid filling wells by a water hauler or fire department. This could contaminate the owner's well because water from an unknown source may contain toxins and water would likely leak out in a short amount of time.

- Check water systems for leaks and fix them. This can also save money for those on public water.

- Ensure you have a full load before running dishwashers and washing machines.

- Space out water usage to avoid a temporary shortage that could damage the pump.

- If using drinking water from an outside source, make sure containers and the water source are clean.

- Use a licensed well driller or pump installer to check water levels in wells for the most accurate assessment and advice and to avoid contamination.

The Drought Task Force is made up of state, federal and private scientific, agricultural, regulatory, water use and natural resources organizations and assists in monitoring, coordinating, and managing responses to droughts and recommends actions to minimize impacts to public health, safety, the environment and agriculture.

The Task Force will continue to monitor the situation and plans to convene again in two weeks.

The Maine Emergency Management Agency Prepares for Tropical Storm Isaias

1 month 2 weeks ago
AUGUSTA, MAINE -The Maine Emergency Management Agency is closely monitoring the track of Tropical Storm Isaias and is working with the Emergency Response Team, County Emergency Management Agencies, the National Weather Service, other State agencies and utilities to prepare for the possibility of damaging winds, rain and power outages. The fast-moving storm is expected to have the most impact on coastal areas and western Maine, with most activity between 8 and midnight tonight. Wind gusts of up to 50 mph may impact parts of the state and there is a potential for tornadoes.

"We are working together with all our partners to plan for this event," said Maine Emergency Management Agency Director Peter Rogers. The storm has been downgraded somewhat from the original forecast, but we are concerned about damaging winds and the potential for tornadoes.

MEMA is working with electric utilities to help facilitate getting additional crews in place, where needed, to help expedite the power restoration process.

Steps people can take to prepare for the tropical storm include: - Building an emergency Kit to include supplies needed for several days without power, including food, water, hand sanitizer and face masks. - Make a family plan and discuss with your family. - Getting the latest alerts and warnings by downloading the free FEMA app or National Weather Service app. - Ensure cell phones are enabled to receive National Weather Service Wireless Emergency Alerts for tornadoes, flash flooding and other emergency situations. - Avoid driving down flooded roadways. - Determine local evacuation routes. - Identify alternate shelter locations in case you need to evacuate. - Follow Covid-19 shelter guidelines such as wearing masks, social distancing, washing hands and avoiding congregate shelters if you are not feeling well. - Bring in all outdoor furniture, decorations, garbage cans and anything else that is not tied down. - Charge cell phones and other electronic devices. - Remove boats and other watercraft from the water. - Ensure generators are properly installed and in good working order.

Although hurricanes are rare in Maine, in 2011 Hurricane Irene, which was downgraded to a tropical storm by the time it reached Maine, resulted in a disaster declaration for several counties in Maine. Hurricane season is June 1-November 30. Please visit us on Facebook and Twitter for more information.

State Drought Task Force Convenes: Little Change to Statewide Drought Conditions

1 month 2 weeks ago
AUGUSTA, MAINE - Maine's Drought Task Force convened today by virtual meeting to address continuing drought conditions across the state. The state remains mostly in moderate or severe drought, due to lower than normal precipitation and higher than normal temperatures for this time of year. Western Maine is experiencing either normal or abnormally dry conditions, due to higher amounts of rain in that area.

"We're not out of the woods yet, but there is a lot of good news in many parts of the state given the recent rain we've received," said Maine Emergency Management Agency Director Peter Rogers. "We continue to be concerned with Aroostook County, which has seen below normal rainfall and continues to be in severe drought conditions for a third week."

"Groundwater and streamflow conditions have improved into the normal or even above normal range for this time of year for western, southern and parts of central Maine," said Nicholas Stasulis, Data Section Chief, U.S. Geological Survey. "In eastern and northern parts of the state, there has not been consistent rainfall, so conditions remain below normal. Parts of the St. John and St. Croix basins are of particular concern."

"We have seen some improvement in rainfall amounts, mostly in southern and western Maine, but not in central and northern Maine," said Tom Hawley of the National Weather Service in Gray. "The drought is not expected to worsen in the next seven days and could even improve."

The Maine Department of Health and Human Services, Center for Disease Control, Drinking Water Program (DWP) reports that they are continuing to monitor hydrologic conditions statewide and prepare suppliers for drought, but no public drinking water systems are currently reporting problems related to drought.

The Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry reported continued impacts to crops, especially in Aroostook County.

The Drought Task Force is made up of state, federal and private scientific, agricultural, regulatory, water use and natural resources organizations and assists in monitoring, coordinating, and managing responses to droughts and recommends actions to minimize impacts to public health, safety, the environment and agriculture.

The Task Force will continue to monitor the situation and plans to convene again in two weeks.

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State Drought Task Force Convenes: Little Change to Statewide Drought Conditions

1 month 4 weeks ago
AUGUSTA, MAINE - Maine's Drought Task Force convened today by virtual meeting to address continuing drought conditions across the state. The state remains mostly in moderate or severe drought, due to lower than normal precipitation and higher than normal temperatures for this time of year. Western Maine is experiencing either normal or abnormally dry conditions, due to higher amounts of rain in that area.

"We're not out of the woods yet, but there is a lot of good news in many parts of the state given the recent rain we've received," said Maine Emergency Management Agency Director Peter Rogers. "We continue to be concerned with Aroostook County, which has seen below normal rainfall and continues to be in severe drought conditions for a third week."

"Groundwater and streamflow conditions have improved into the normal or even above normal range for this time of year for western, southern and parts of central Maine," said Nicholas Stasulis, Data Section Chief, U.S. Geological Survey. "In eastern and northern parts of the state, there has not been consistent rainfall, so conditions remain below normal. Parts of the St. John and St. Croix basins are of particular concern."

"We have seen some improvement in rainfall amounts, mostly in southern and western Maine, but not in central and northern Maine," said Tom Hawley of the National Weather Service in Gray. "The drought is not expected to worsen in the next seven days and could even improve."

The Maine Department of Health and Human Services, Center for Disease Control, Drinking Water Program (DWP) reports that they are continuing to monitor hydrologic conditions statewide and prepare suppliers for drought, but no public drinking water systems are currently reporting problems related to drought.

The Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry reported continued impacts to crops, especially in Aroostook County.

The Drought Task Force is made up of state, federal and private scientific, agricultural, regulatory, water use and natural resources organizations and assists in monitoring, coordinating, and managing responses to droughts and recommends actions to minimize impacts to public health, safety, the environment and agriculture.

The Task Force will continue to monitor the situation and plans to convene again in two weeks.

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Drought Task Force Convenes Today as Entire State Faces Abnormally Dry or Moderate Drought Conditions

2 months 1 week ago
AUGUSTA, MAINE -Maine's Drought Task Force (DTF) Convened today by virtual meeting to assess drought conditions across the state. Maine has experienced drought conditions in some form for the last five years after a period of 14 years with no significant drought conditions.

"We have been monitoring drought conditions in Maine for several weeks now," said Maine Emergency Management Agency Director Peter Rogers. "Unfortunately, the lack of rain combined with a period of very warm temperatures has left every county in the state impacted, with about 47 percent of the state in moderate drought and the rest abnormally dry, according to the U.S. Drought monitor."

"There could be some localized relief to the dry weather especially in northern Maine this weekend and into next week," said Tom Hawley of the National Weather Service in Gray. "However, the overall trend is for warm weather and below normal precipitation which could worsen the drought over the next few weeks."

Surface and groundwater levels were normal in March when the State's River Flow Advisory Commission met to assess flood threat in Maine, but drought conditions have rapidly evolved since mid-May causing what experts call a flash drought.

"The USGS has 36 stations where we monitor streamflow with 30 or more years of record, and nearly all of them are below normal for this time of year and some are the lowest level ever for a given day," said Nicholas Stasulis, Data Section Chief, U.S. Geological Survey. "Groundwater conditions vary across the state, but overall those levels have been declining steadily since the spring runoff."

The DTF is made up of state, federal and private scientific, agricultural, regulatory, water use and natural resources organizations and assists in monitoring, coordinating, and managing responses to droughts and recommends actions to minimize impacts to public health, safety, the environment and agriculture.

Several counties across the state are reporting cases of dry wells and impacts to agriculture. Citizens who may be experiencing low water levels in wells can take steps to conserve water and are reminded of the following:

- Avoid filling wells by a water hauler or fire department. This could contaminate the owner's well because water from an unknown source may contain toxins and water would likely leak out in a short amount of time. - Check water systems for leaks and fix them. This can also save money for those on public water. - Ensure you have a full load before running dishwashers and washing machines. - Space out water usage to avoid a temporary shortage that could damage the pump. - If using drinking water from an outside source, make sure containers and the water source are clean. - Use a licensed well driller or pump installer to check water levels in wells for the most accurate assessment and advice and to avoid contamination.

Additional tips for conserving water are available at Maine.gov/MEMA.

The Task Force will continue to monitor the situation and plans to convene again in two weeks. Reports will be available online at Maine.gov/MEMA or can be obtained from MEMA by calling 207-624-4400.

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State Drought Conditions Improve in Western Maine, Worsen to the North

2 months 1 week ago
AUGUSTA, MAINE - Maine's Drought Task Force convened today by virtual meeting to take another look at drought conditions across the state. The Task Force met two weeks ago, as the entire state was in abnormally dry or moderate drought conditions. More than 93 percent of the state remains in some form of dry or drought condition.

"Western Maine saw a great deal of improvement due to the heavy rain this week," said Maine Emergency Management Agency Director Peter Rogers. "What concerns me the most is the progression to D2 or Severe Drought in northern Maine."

The Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry reported impacts to crops, including hay, potatoes, wheat and barley as well as an increase in invasive species due to the lack of rain in northern Maine.

"There has been some improvement in groundwater and streamflow in the last few weeks, but we do need more rain" said Nicholas Stasulis, Data Section Chief, U.S. Geological Survey. "We have seen a lot of rain in a short period of time in some areas, but what we need is rain over a longer period of time, so it can maintain streamflow levels."

"We are expecting some rain over the next week, but it will vary across the state," said Tom Hawley of the National Weather Service in Gray. "Overall, the forecast for the next couple weeks calls for lower than normal precipitation and higher than normal temperatures, which unfortunately won't improve the drought."

The Maine Department of Health and Human Services, Center for Disease Control, Drinking Water Program (DWP) reports that many public water systems in Maine are currently taking steps to prepare for a drought and/or modify operations to accommodate low water.

The Drought Task Force is made up of state, federal and private scientific, agricultural, regulatory, water use and natural resources organizations and assists in monitoring, coordinating, and managing responses to droughts and recommends actions to minimize impacts to public health, safety, the environment and agriculture.

The Task Force will continue to monitor the situation and plans to convene again in two weeks.

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Drought Task Force Convenes Today as Entire State Faces Abnormally Dry or Moderate Drought Conditions

2 months 2 weeks ago
AUGUSTA, MAINE -Maine's Drought Task Force (DTF) Convened today by virtual meeting to assess drought conditions across the state. Maine has experienced drought conditions in some form for the last five years after a period of 14 years with no significant drought conditions.

"We have been monitoring drought conditions in Maine for several weeks now," said Maine Emergency Management Agency Director Peter Rogers. "Unfortunately, the lack of rain combined with a period of very warm temperatures has left every county in the state impacted, with about 47 percent of the state in moderate drought and the rest abnormally dry, according to the U.S. Drought monitor."

"There could be some localized relief to the dry weather especially in northern Maine this weekend and into next week," said Tom Hawley of the National Weather Service in Gray. "However, the overall trend is for warm weather and below normal precipitation which could worsen the drought over the next few weeks."

Surface and groundwater levels were normal in March when the State's River Flow Advisory Commission met to assess flood threat in Maine, but drought conditions have rapidly evolved since mid-May causing what experts call a flash drought.

"The USGS has 36 stations where we monitor streamflow with 30 or more years of record, and nearly all of them are below normal for this time of year and some are the lowest level ever for a given day," said Nicholas Stasulis, Data Section Chief, U.S. Geological Survey. "Groundwater conditions vary across the state, but overall those levels have been declining steadily since the spring runoff."

The DTF is made up of state, federal and private scientific, agricultural, regulatory, water use and natural resources organizations and assists in monitoring, coordinating, and managing responses to droughts and recommends actions to minimize impacts to public health, safety, the environment and agriculture.

Several counties across the state are reporting cases of dry wells and impacts to agriculture. Citizens who may be experiencing low water levels in wells can take steps to conserve water and are reminded of the following:

- Avoid filling wells by a water hauler or fire department. This could contaminate the owner's well because water from an unknown source may contain toxins and water would likely leak out in a short amount of time. - Check water systems for leaks and fix them. This can also save money for those on public water. - Ensure you have a full load before running dishwashers and washing machines. - Space out water usage to avoid a temporary shortage that could damage the pump. - If using drinking water from an outside source, make sure containers and the water source are clean. - Use a licensed well driller or pump installer to check water levels in wells for the most accurate assessment and advice and to avoid contamination.

Additional tips for conserving water are available at Maine.gov/MEMA.

The Task Force will continue to monitor the situation and plans to convene again in two weeks. Reports will be available online at Maine.gov/MEMA or can be obtained from MEMA by calling 207-624-4400.

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Drought Task Force Convenes Today as Entire State Faces Abnormally Dry or Moderate Drought Conditions

2 months 3 weeks ago
AUGUSTA, MAINE -Maine's Drought Task Force (DTF) Convened today by virtual meeting to assess drought conditions across the state. Maine has experienced drought conditions in some form for the last five years after a period of 14 years with no significant drought conditions.

"We have been monitoring drought conditions in Maine for several weeks now," said Maine Emergency Management Agency Director Peter Rogers. "Unfortunately, the lack of rain combined with a period of very warm temperatures has left every county in the state impacted, with about 47 percent of the state in moderate drought and the rest abnormally dry, according to the U.S. Drought monitor."

"There could be some localized relief to the dry weather especially in northern Maine this weekend and into next week," said Tom Hawley of the National Weather Service in Gray. "However, the overall trend is for warm weather and below normal precipitation which could worsen the drought over the next few weeks."

Surface and groundwater levels were normal in March when the State's River Flow Advisory Commission met to assess flood threat in Maine, but drought conditions have rapidly evolved since mid-May causing what experts call a flash drought.

"The USGS has 36 stations where we monitor streamflow with 30 or more years of record, and nearly all of them are below normal for this time of year and some are the lowest level ever for a given day," said Nicholas Stasulis, Data Section Chief, U.S. Geological Survey. "Groundwater conditions vary across the state, but overall those levels have been declining steadily since the spring runoff."

The DTF is made up of state, federal and private scientific, agricultural, regulatory, water use and natural resources organizations and assists in monitoring, coordinating, and managing responses to droughts and recommends actions to minimize impacts to public health, safety, the environment and agriculture.

Several counties across the state are reporting cases of dry wells and impacts to agriculture. Citizens who may be experiencing low water levels in wells can take steps to conserve water and are reminded of the following:

- Avoid filling wells by a water hauler or fire department. This could contaminate the owner's well because water from an unknown source may contain toxins and water would likely leak out in a short amount of time. - Check water systems for leaks and fix them. This can also save money for those on public water. - Ensure you have a full load before running dishwashers and washing machines. - Space out water usage to avoid a temporary shortage that could damage the pump. - If using drinking water from an outside source, make sure containers and the water source are clean. - Use a licensed well driller or pump installer to check water levels in wells for the most accurate assessment and advice and to avoid contamination.

Additional tips for conserving water are available at Maine.gov/MEMA.

The Task Force will continue to monitor the situation and plans to convene again in two weeks. Reports will be available online at Maine.gov/MEMA or can be obtained from MEMA by calling 207-624-4400.

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