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Disaster Recovery Center to Open in Sumas

4 hours 23 minutes ago
Disaster Recovery Center to Open in Sumas

LACEY, Wash. – FEMA, in partnership with the Washington State Military Department’s Emergency Management Division, will open a Disaster Recovery Center in Whatcom County Monday, Jan. 24, to help survivors of the November flooding and mudslides.

The center is located at:

Sumas A.C. Church, 125 Front St., Sumas, WA 98295. Hours: Monday 9 a.m. – 8 p.m., Tuesday 2 p.m. – 8 p.m., Wednesday to Saturday 9 a.m. – 8 p.m., Sunday 2 p.m. – 8 p.m.

Recovery specialists from FEMA, the U.S. Small Business Administration and Washington state agencies will be available to help residents of Clallam, Skagit and Whatcom counties, including the Lummi Nation, Nooksack Indian Tribe, the Quileute Nation and other tribes in the three counties, apply for federal assistance and receive information about help available for homeowners, renters and business owners.

It is not necessary to go to a center to apply for assistance. Residents in the designated counties can apply online at disasterassistance.gov, call 800-621-3362, or use the FEMA mobile app. If you use a relay service, such as video relay (VRS), captioned telephone or other service, give FEMA the number for that service.

FEMA financial assistance may include money for temporary housing, basic home repairs or other disaster-related needs such as childcare, transportation and medical, funeral or dental expenses.

For an accessible video on how to apply for FEMA assistance, go to youtube.com/watch?v=WZGpWI2RCNw.

For more information about Washington flood and mudslide recovery, visit fema.gov/disaster/4635. Follow the FEMA Region 10 Twitter account at twitter.com/femaregion10.

###

FEMA’s mission is helping people before, during, and after disasters.      

The Washington State Military Department’s Emergency Management Division leads and coordinates mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery in Washington State to minimize the impact of disasters and emergencies on the people, property, environment and economy.

mary.j.edmon Sun, 01/23/2022 - 16:56
mary.j.edmon

Disaster Recovery Center Opens in Whatcom County

1 day 17 hours ago
Disaster Recovery Center Opens in Whatcom County

LACEY, Wash. – FEMA, in partnership with the Washington State Military Department’s Emergency Management Division, will open a Disaster Recovery Center at 3 p.m. today, Jan. 21, in Whatcom County to help survivors of the November flooding and mudslides.

Center location:

  • Parking lot, 1208 East Main St., Everson, WA 98247

Hours are 9 a.m. – 8 p.m. Monday – Saturday, noon to 6 p.m. Sunday.

Recovery specialists from FEMA, the U.S. Small Business Administration and Washington state agencies will be available to help residents of Clallam, Skagit and Whatcom counties, including the Lummi Nation, Nooksack Indian Tribe, the Quileute Nation and other tribes in the three counties, apply for federal assistance and receive information about help available for homeowners, renters and business owners.

It is not necessary to go to a center to apply for assistance. Residents in the designated counties can apply online at disasterassistance.gov, call 800-621-3362, or use the FEMA mobile app. If you use a relay service, such as video relay (VRS), captioned telephone or other service, give FEMA the number for that service.

FEMA financial assistance may include money for temporary housing, basic home repairs or other disaster-related needs such as childcare, transportation and medical, funeral or dental expenses.

For an accessible video on how to apply for FEMA assistance, go to youtube.com/watch?v=WZGpWI2RCNw.

For more information about Washington flood and mudslide recovery, visit fema.gov/disaster/4635. Follow the FEMA Region 10 Twitter account at twitter.com/femaregion10.

###

FEMA’s mission is helping people before, during, and after disasters.      

The Washington State Military Department’s Emergency Management Division leads and coordinates mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery in Washington State to minimize the impact of disasters and emergencies on the people, property, environment and economy.

mary.j.edmon Sat, 01/22/2022 - 03:37
mary.j.edmon

Understanding Your FEMA Letter

1 day 17 hours ago
Understanding Your FEMA Letter

LACEY, Wash. Washington residents who applied for assistance from FEMA after sustaining damage from floods and mudslides in November will receive a letter from the agency in the mail or via email.

The letter will explain your application status and how to respond. It is important to read the letter carefully because it will include the amount of any assistance FEMA may provide and information on the appropriate use of disaster assistance funds.

Applicants may need to submit additional information or supporting documentation for FEMA to continue to process an application for financial assistance. Examples of missing documentation may include:

Proof of insurance coverage

Settlement of insurance claims or denial letter from insurance provider

Proof of identity

Proof of occupancy

Proof of ownership

  • Proof that the damaged property was the applicant’s primary residence at the time of the disaster

If you have questions about your letter, go online to DisasterAssistance.gov or call 800-621-3362. If you use a relay service, such as video relay (VRS), captioned telephone or other service, give FEMA the number for that service.

A FEMA inspection may be required to determine whether a home is safe, accessible and functional. Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, FEMA is conducting exterior inspections. An interior inspection is not mandatory but if the owner and the inspector agree, an interior inspection may be conducted.

FEMA assistance is not the same as insurance. FEMA assistance only provides funds for basic work to make a home habitable, including items such as a roof, critical utilities, windows, toilets and doors.

Appealing FEMA’s Decision

Applicants who disagree with FEMA’s decision or the amount of assistance may submit an appeal letter and documents supporting their claim, such as a contractor’s estimate for home repairs.  FEMA cannot duplicate assistance provided by another source such as insurance settlements. However, those who are underinsured may receive further assistance for unmet needs after insurance claims have been settled by submitting insurance settlement or denial documents to FEMA. FEMA does not provide assistance for insurance deductibles.

Please submit the appeal in writing. In a signed and dated letter, explain the reason(s) for the appeal. It should also include:

Applicant’s full name

FEMA disaster number (FEMA DR-4635-WA for this disaster)

Address of the pre-disaster primary residence

Applicant’s current phone number and address

  • FEMA application number on all documents

A letter must be postmarked within 60 days of the date of the determination letter. An appeal letter and supporting documents may be submitted to the agency via a FEMA online account or by mail or fax.

To set up a FEMA online account, visit DisasterAssistance.gov, click on “Apply Online” and follow the directions in English or Spanish. At the account, you can also check the status of your application and upload personal information and documents as well as the appeal letter.

Or mail to FEMA National Processing Service Center, P.O. Box 10055, Hyattsville MD 20782-7055.

  • Or fax to 800-827-8112 (Attention: FEMA).

How to Apply for FEMA Assistance

Disaster survivors in Clallam, Skagit and Whatcom counties, including the Lummi Nation, Nooksack Indian Tribe, the Quileute Nation and other tribes in the three counties, may apply for assistance from FEMA’s Individuals and Households Program. Survivors can apply online at DisasterAssistance.gov, by calling 800-621-3362, or by using the FEMA mobile app. If you use a relay service, such as video relay (VRS), captioned telephone or other service, give FEMA the number for that service.

For an American Sign Language video on FEMA determination letters and the appeals process, visit youtube.com/watch?v=zehkQn8P5HI.

For more information about Washington flood recovery, visit fema.gov/disaster/4635.  Follow the FEMA Region 10 Twitter account at twitter.com/femaregion10.

###

FEMA’s mission is helping people before, during, and after disasters.      

The Washington State Military Department’s Emergency Management Division leads and coordinates mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery in the state to minimize the impact of disasters and emergencies on the people, property, environment and economy.

mary.j.edmon Sat, 01/22/2022 - 03:27
mary.j.edmon

FEMA Housing Inspectors Assessing Tennessee Tornado Damage

2 days ago
FEMA Housing Inspectors Assessing Tennessee Tornado Damage

NASHVILLE, Tenn. – FEMA Housing Inspectors are now calling on tornado survivors in middle and western Tennessee to assess damage following the severe weather in December. Residents from a 12-county area designated in the recent federal declaration for middle and west Tennessee are eligible to apply for FEMA. The counties are Cheatham, Davidson, Dickson, Gibson, Henderson, Henry, Lake, Obion, Stewart, Sumner, Weakley, and Wilson. When applying for FEMA assistance, you may be assigned a housing inspector at that time

The inspector will call and may confirm the last four digits of your FEMA registration number and then schedule an appointment seven to 10 days after your initial application to assess property damage.

Also, if you carry homeowners’ insurance, FEMA may not send an inspector right away. You’ll need to submit insurance documentation to verify your coverage doesn’t meet your disaster-related needs or you have exhausted the “Additional Living Expenses” provided by the insurance company. FEMA cannot pay for damage covered by insurance or duplicate benefits from another source.

If you have already begun repairs or replacement, damage should be documented through photos and/or videos. All receipts for disaster-related purchases should be kept. These can be submitted as a follow-up to your application.

The inspection generally takes 30-40 minutes and consists of a general examination of the home. Inspectors are required to review and document both structural and personal property damage to file a report, but they do not determine eligibility or the value of damage or losses. FEMA officials will review the inspection report and issue an eligibility determination letter within a week of the inspection. If the application is approved, the letter will provide specific information on how the funds can be used.  If you disagree with FEMA’s decision, the letter explains how you can appeal the decision.

An inspection cannot be done unless the applicant, co-registrant or pre-authorized third party is present. Residents may be asked to verify their identity with one of the following:

  • Photo identification, such as a driver’s license or passport,
  • Proof of occupancy, such as a lease, rent payment receipt or utility bill, or
  • Proof of ownership, such as a deed, title, mortgage payment book, property insurance policy or tax receipts.
  • List of household occupants living in residence at time of disaster.

An authorized inspector will wear an official FEMA ID badge. Survivors are encouraged to verify credentials prior to providing any information. If the inspector is not an official FEMA representative, and requests any personal or financial information, end the meeting immediately and notify local law enforcement. FEMA inspectors never ask for money or bank account information.

If you need accommodations for language or disability, call the FEMA Helpline at 800-621-3362 (TTY 800-462-7585) and let the specialists know your needs. This is also the time to update FEMA with the number assigned to you if you use a relay service.

Survivors in the designated counties who have not applied to FEMA yet may do so in one of the following ways:

  • Online at DisasterAssistance.gov.
  • Call the FEMA Helpline at 800-621-3362 (TTY 800-462-7585). Operators can answer questions about applications already submitted. Lines are open daily from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. local time, seven days a week. If you use a relay service, such as video relay service (VRS), captioned telephone service or others, give FEMA the number for that service.
  • Or use the FEMA app downloaded to a smartphone or tablet

For more information on Tennessee’s disaster recovery, visit www.tn.gov/tema.html and www.fema.gov/disaster/4637. You may also follow FEMA on www.facebook.com/fema and Twitter @FEMARegion4.

felicia.jordan Fri, 01/21/2022 - 20:42
felicia.jordan

FEMA’s U.S. Fire Administration Launches New Podcast

2 days 1 hour ago
FEMA’s U.S. Fire Administration Launches New Podcast

WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Fire Administration is launching a new podcast, with the first episode airing today.

“These podcasts are a new and innovative way to communicate with the fire and EMS responders, as well as their communities,” said U.S. Fire Administrator Dr. Lori Moore-Merrell.  “We look forward to insightful discussions with prominent emergency service leaders, health and safety experts, community risk reduction specialists and fire service researchers. Stay tuned!”

The monthly episodes will allow listeners to join our nation’s fire and EMS experts to discuss the USFA programs and other emergent issues. On today’s episode, Dr. Moore-Merrell and Deputy U.S. Fire Administrator Tonya Hoover will discuss agency programs and their vision for the future.

Subscribe to “The USFA Podcast” on Apple or Google Podcasts to get USFA’s first episode in your feed or visit usfa.fema.gov/podcasts for more information.

mayshaunt.gary Fri, 01/21/2022 - 19:26
mayshaunt.gary

Disaster Recovery Center Opens in Clallam County

2 days 2 hours ago
Disaster Recovery Center Opens in Clallam County

LACEY, WA. – FEMA, in partnership with the Washington State Military Department’s Emergency Management Division, will open a Disaster Recovery Center Friday, Jan. 21, in Forks to help survivors of the November flooding and mudslides.

Center location:

  • ICN Building, 71 N. Spartan Ave., Forks, WA 98331

The center will operate Friday through Sunday from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Recovery specialists from FEMA, the U.S. Small Business Administration and Washington state agencies will be available to help residents of Clallam, Skagit and Whatcom counties, including members of the Lummi Nation, Nooksack Indian Tribe, the Quileute Nation and other tribes in the three counties, apply for federal assistance and receive information about help available for homeowners, renters and business owners.

It is not necessary to go to a center to apply for assistance. Residents and tribal members in the designated counties can apply online at disasterassistance.gov, call 800-621-3362, or use the FEMA mobile app. If you use a relay service, such as video relay (VRS), captioned telephone or other service, give FEMA the number for that service.

FEMA financial assistance may include money for temporary housing, basic home repairs or other disaster-related needs such as childcare, transportation and medical, funeral or dental expenses.

For an accessible video on how to apply for FEMA assistance, go to youtube.com/watch?v=WZGpWI2RCNw.

For more information about Washington flood and mudslide recovery, visit fema.gov/disaster/4635. Follow the FEMA Region 10 Twitter account at twitter.com/femaregion10.

###

FEMA’s mission is helping people before, during, and after disasters.

The Washington State Military Department’s Emergency Management Division leads and coordinates mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery in Washington State to minimize the impact of disasters and emergencies on the people, property, environment and economy.

mary.j.edmon Fri, 01/21/2022 - 19:06
mary.j.edmon

U.S. Departments of Homeland Security and Education Release Toolkit of Federal Resources to Help Rebuild Puerto Rico’s School Infrastructure

2 days 4 hours ago
U.S. Departments of Homeland Security and Education Release Toolkit of Federal Resources to Help Rebuild Puerto Rico’s School Infrastructure

Guaynabo, Puerto Rico – Today, the Department of Homeland Security's (DHS) Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), and the U.S. Department of Education released a toolkit outlining federal resources available to help Puerto Rico recover and rebuild safe, healthy, and modernized school facilities. The Departments of Energy and Labor, as well as the Environmental Protection Agency, also collaborated on the toolkit.

The toolkit focuses on four key aspects to supplement ongoing recovery efforts in the education sector: planning and design, workforce readiness, contracting and procurement, and project review.  In addition, the document includes a directory with technical assistance opportunities and information on other funding sources from federal partners.

"As Puerto Rico continues to rebuild, recover, and reimagine a future of security and prosperity for all of its families, DHS will be there every step of the way," said Secretary of Homeland Security Alejandro N. Mayorkas. "I encourage officials to use the resources available to them through the federal government to build safe and resilient schools for teachers and students."

"All children deserve to have the opportunity to learn and thrive in safe and functioning educational facilities," said FEMA Administrator Deanne Criswell.  "FEMA is proud to continue supporting Puerto Rico through this important phase of work."

"The Biden-Harris Administration is committed to supporting a full recovery in Puerto Rico grounded in dignity, equity, and respect," said Secretary of Education Miguel Cardona. "Education is a critical component of full recovery, and access to first-class facilities is a first step in providing all students in Puerto Rico—the island of my roots—with the high-quality education they deserve."

This toolkit was generated by the White House Working Group on Puerto Rico, which was launched in July 2021 to provide Puerto Rico the resources and technical assistance it needs to recover and prosper.

After multiple natural disasters, Puerto Rico has access to extensive recovery resources, including more than $2 billion in FEMA Public Assistance for school infrastructure related to recovery. Additionally, billions more in federal education and COVID-19 relief funds are available to assist with addressing and recovering from COVID-19. These funds may also include upgrades to school infrastructure, depending on the program.

To date, FEMA has obligated over $25.9 billion towards response and recovery efforts in Puerto Rico. FEMA is helping rebuild large parts of the island and supporting the government of Puerto Rico's plan to restore critical services systems and build capacity in a manner that is both fiscally sound and resilient against the impacts of future disaster.

On Jan. 27, 2022, at 3pm ET/4pm AT, the White House will host a webinar where agencies will discuss the toolkit and resources it identifies. The webinar will be held on Zoom and requires advance registration.

To see the full toolkit, visit: Interagency Technical Assistance Toolkit for School Infrastructure in Puerto Rico (or in Spanish).

For more information on Puerto Rico's recovery from Hurricane María, please visit fema.gov/es/disaster/4339 and recuperacion.pr.

Follow our social media pages at Facebook.com/FEMAPuertoRico, Facebook.com/COR3pr and Twitter @COR3pr.

mayshaunt.gary Fri, 01/21/2022 - 16:27
mayshaunt.gary

FEMA Mobile Vaccination Unit Supports COVID Testing and Vaccinations in Philadelphia

2 days 5 hours ago
FEMA Mobile Vaccination Unit Supports COVID Testing and Vaccinations in Philadelphia

PHILADELPHIA – The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) recently deployed staff and a Mobile Vaccination Unit, a self-contained vaccination center on wheels, and staff to support the City of Philadelphia’s pandemic fight.

These FEMA resources will support mobile vaccinations in hard-hit communities throughout the city and a central vaccination location in partnership with Philadelphia’s Black Doctor’s Consortium (BDC) through mid-February. Over the past year, BDC’s mobile COVID-19 testing and vaccination operation have broken down many barriers supporting tests and vaccinations for thousands of Philadelphians throughout many historically unreserved communities.

FEMA clinical and administrative staff will support BDC’s efforts out of their Ala Stanford Center for Health Equity (ASHE Center) in North Philadelphia. The ASHE Center provides an array of primary and pediatric care, along with COVID-19 testing and vaccines since its opening in October 2021. Additionally, FEMA staff and the Mobile Vaccination Unit will support BDC’s partnership with the Philadelphia School District, providing mobile vaccination capabilities at school facilities throughout the city.

“FEMA has worked with the Pennsylvania Emergency Management Agency, as well as the Philadelphia Office of Emergency Management and Philadelphia Department of Public Health from the beginning of the pandemic. We continue to support the Commonwealth and City on this vital mission through a unique, community focused partnership to assist with equitable vaccine delivery,” said FEMA Region 3 Regional Administrator MaryAnn Tierney. “FEMA understands the disproportionate impact that disasters, like the pandemic, have on many communities. The added staff and logistics capabilities this federal support brings to Philadelphia will expand access to vaccination and testing in some of the city’s hardest hit areas.”

The mobile vaccination sites will be able to provide up to several hundred vaccinations per day, with both Black Doctor’s Consortium and FEMA contracted clinical staff delivering shots in arms. FEMA non-clinical staff, supporting the operations administrative needs and logistics, will free up BDC’s medical personnel to focus more efforts on clinical roles. 

This operation kicked off on Martin Luther King Jr. Day, a day on for the FEMA staff supporting this mission. FEMA staff supported BDC’s COVID-19 testing and vaccinations at the ASHE Center, as well as testing at the Greater Philadelphia MLK Day event at Girard College. Black Doctor’s Consortium clinical staff were able to provide hundreds of COVID-19 tests at both events with the enhanced capabilities provided by the addition of federal staff.

"Black Doctor's Consortium has always gone to areas where people live, work, worship and play. With children, you go to school, which is why we partnered with the School District of Philadelphia," said Dr. Ala Stanford, BDC's founder and CEO. "Our children are significantly impacted by the virus at higher rates than previously seen during the pandemic. For the first time since the pandemic started, we've seen more children hospitalized and becoming seriously ill from COVID. By educating our students and families, we are helping them to make informed decisions, working to keep our children safe, and ensuring that schools can safely stay open for in-person learning."

“For the last year, FEMA has been a key partner in responding to the COVID-19 pandemic,” said Health Commissioner Dr. Cheryl Bettigole. “This mobile vaccine unit is more evidence that the power of private, local, and federal partnerships can address critical needs in under-resourced areas. We welcome FEMA’s support and look forward to continued efforts to fight the pandemic.”

Previous FEMA support to the pandemic fight in Philadelphia was resoundingly successful. Between March and June of 2021, FEMA supported two large scale community vaccination centers in Philadelphia, accounting for more than 350,000 vaccinations and nearly a quarter of all vaccinations given in the city during that time. In addition to directly supporting shots in arms, FEMA supported the City of Philadelphia with extensive outreach efforts in vulnerable communities, including deploying street teams to canvass local commercial corridors and community centers, speaking engagements and trusted messenger tours with community and faith-based organizations, partnering with disability advocacy organizations and health care providers, and partnering with public transit agencies to mitigate transportation barriers to vaccine accessibility.

This most recent deployment to Philadelphia is in addition to a federally supported COVID-19 testing site located at the Cibotti Recreation Center in Southwest Philadelphia. The site is operated by a testing contractor coordinated by the Centers for Disease Control’s Increasing Community Access to Testing (ICATT) program and can administer more than 500 tests per day in support of the Philadelphia Department of Public Health’s city-wide testing operation.

Earlier in January, FEMA responded to a request from the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania with the deployment of federal medical assistance teams, comprised of Department of Defense medical providers, to add medical staff capabilities to key regional hospital systems.   

For more information on BDC’s testing and vaccination schedules, visit: www.bdccares.com

For more information on the City of Philadelphia’s COVID-19 vaccination and testing efforts, including the federally supported testing site, visit: www.phila.gov/covid

A FEMA Mobile Vaccination Units arrived in Philadelphia on January 15th. These self-contained vaccination centers can be set up anywhere in support of local partners. The Philadelphia MVU will bring vaccination capabilities closer to the communities and people that need them, reducing some of the barriers to vaccinations. 

FEMA Corps Staff prepare COVID-19 Testing Stations at the Greater Philadelphia MLK Day of Service Event on January 17th, 2022 at Girard College.

Black Doctor’s Consortium Founder and CEO Dr. Ala Stanford delivers a morning briefing to BDC’s clinical staff, FEMA staff and volunteers at the Greater Philadelphia MLK Day of Service at Girard College on January 17th, 2022 at Girard College.

amanda.hancher Fri, 01/21/2022 - 16:01
amanda.hancher

Los Departamentos de Seguridad Nacional y de Educación de EE. UU. publican un kit de herramientas de recursos federales para ayudar a reconstruir la infraestructura escolar de Puerto Rico

2 days 8 hours ago
U.S. Departments of Homeland Security and Education Release Toolkit of Federal Resources to Help Rebuild Puerto Rico’s School Infrastructure

Guaynabo, Puerto Rico –Today, the Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS) Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), and the U.S. Department of Education released a toolkit outlining federal resources available to help Puerto Rico recover and rebuild safe, healthy, and modernized school facilities.  The Departments of Energy and Labor, as well as the Environmental Protection Agency, also collaborated on the toolkit.

The toolkit focuses on four key aspects to supplement ongoing recovery efforts in the education sector: planning and design, workforce readiness, contracting and procurement, and project review.  In addition, the document includes a directory with technical assistance opportunities and information on other funding sources from federal partners.

“As Puerto Rico continues to rebuild, recover, and reimagine a future of security and prosperity for all of its families, DHS will be there every step of the way,” said Secretary of Homeland Security Alejandro N. Mayorkas.  “I encourage officials to use the resources available to them through the federal government to build safe and resilient schools for teachers and students.”

“All children deserve to have the opportunity to learn and thrive in safe and functioning educational facilities,” said FEMA Administrator Deanne Criswell.  “FEMA is proud to continue supporting Puerto Rico through this important phase of work.”

“The Biden-Harris Administration is committed to supporting a full recovery in Puerto Rico grounded in dignity, equity, and respect,” said Secretary of Education Miguel Cardona. “Education is a critical component of full recovery, and access to first-class facilities is a first step in providing all students in Puerto Rico—the island of my roots—with the high-quality education they deserve.”

This toolkit was generated by the White House Working Group on Puerto Rico, which was launched in July 2021 to provide Puerto Rico the resources and technical assistance it needs to recover and prosper.

After multiple natural disasters, Puerto Rico has access to extensive recovery resources, including more than $2 billion in FEMA Public Assistance for school infrastructure related to recovery.  Additionally, billions more in federal education and COVID-19 relief funds are available to assist with addressing and recovering from COVID-19.  These funds may also include upgrades to school infrastructure, depending on the program.

To date, FEMA has obligated over $25.9 billion towards response and recovery efforts in Puerto Rico.  FEMA is helping rebuild large parts of the island and supporting the government of Puerto Rico’s plan to restore critical services systems and build capacity in a manner that is both fiscally sound and resilient against the impacts of future disaster.

On Jan. 27, 2022, at 3pm ET/4pm AT, the White House will host a webinar where agencies will discuss the toolkit and resources it identifies.  The webinar will be held on Zoom and requires advance registration.

To see the full toolkit, visit: https://www.fema.gov/sites/default/files/documents/fema_technical-assistance-toolkit_schools-puerto-rico.pdf (English) or https://www.fema.gov/sites/default/files/documents/fema_technical-assistance-toolkit_schools-puerto-rico_spanish.pdf (Spanish).

For more information on Puerto Rico's recovery from Hurricane María, please visit fema.gov/es/disaster/4339 and recuperacion.pr. Follow our social media pages at Facebook.com/FEMAPuertoRico, Facebook.com/COR3pr and Twitter @COR3pr

frances.acevedo-pico Fri, 01/21/2022 - 12:34
frances.acevedo-pico

Citizenship and FEMA Eligibility

2 days 17 hours ago
Citizenship and FEMA Eligibility

FEMA is committed to helping all eligible disaster survivors recover from flooding and mudslides in Washington Nov. 13-15, 2021, including U.S. citizens, non-citizen nationals and qualified aliens.

Disaster survivors in Clallam, Skagit and Whatcom counties, including residents of the Lummi Nation, Nooksack Indian Tribe, the Quileute Nation and other tribes in the three counties, may apply for assistance from FEMA’s Individuals and Households Program. You or a member of your household must be a U.S. citizen, non-citizen national or qualified alien. If you do not meet the status of either U.S. citizen, non-citizen national or qualified alien, your household may still apply for and be considered for IHP assistance if:

  • Another adult member of your household meets the eligibility criteria and certifies their citizenship status during the registration process or signs the Declaration and Release form; or
  • The parent or guardian of a minor child who is a U.S. citizen, non-citizen national, or a qualified alien applies for assistance on behalf of the child, as long as they live in the same household. The parent or legal guardian must register as the co-applicant and the minor child must be under age 18 at the time the disaster occurred.

The deadline to apply for FEMA disaster assistance is March 7, 2022. ​​​​​​​

Qualified aliens

A qualified alien includes:

  • A legal permanent resident (“green card” holder).
  • An asylee, refugee or an alien whose deportation is being withheld.
  • An alien paroled into the U.S. for at least one year.
  • An alien granted conditional entry (per law in effect prior to April 1, 1980).
  • A Cuban or Haitian entrant.
  • Certain aliens subjected to extreme cruelty or who have been a victim of a severe form of human trafficking, including persons with a “T” or “U” visa.
  • Aliens whose children have been abused and alien children whose parent has been abused who fit certain criteria.

Non-Citizen Nationals

A non-citizen national is a person born in an outlying possession of the U.S. (e.g., American Samoa) on or after the date the U.S. acquired the possession, or a person whose parents are U.S. non-citizen nationals. All U.S. citizens are U.S. nationals; however, not every U.S. national is a U.S. citizen.

Qualified Minor Children

The parent or guardian of a minor child living in the same household may apply for assistance on behalf of the minor child who is a U.S. citizen, non-citizen national, or qualified alien. The minor child must be under age 18 as of the first day of the incident period or disaster declaration day, whichever comes first.

Resources

Catholic Immigration Legal Services in Seattle provides legal immigration assistance to low-income residents of Washington: 100 23rd Ave. S, Seattle, WA 98144-2302, phone 206-328-6314; DACA Hotline: 206-566-6664.

See Citizenship and Immigration Status Requirements for Federal Public Benefits for more information in multiple languages at fema.gov/assistance/individual/program/citizenship-immigration-status.

If you’re unsure of your immigration status, talk to an immigration expert to learn if your status falls within the immigration status requirements for FEMA disaster assistance.

Voluntary organizations often offer help regardless of citizenship status. To find voluntary organizations:

Apply for FEMA Disaster Assistance

Apply online at DisasterAssistance.gov, call 800-621-3362 or use the FEMA app for smartphones. If you use a relay service, such as video relay (VRS), captioned telephone or other service, give FEMA the number for that service.

For more information about Washington flood recovery, visit fema.gov/disaster/4635. Follow the FEMA Region 10 Twitter account at twitter.com/femaregion10.

###

mary.j.edmon Fri, 01/21/2022 - 03:50
mary.j.edmon

Be Cold Weather Aware in your FEMA Temporary Housing Unit

2 days 22 hours ago
Be Cold Weather Aware in your FEMA Temporary Housing Unit

BATON ROUGE, La. – Wintry weather and possibly dangerous road conditions are expected in Louisiana tonight through Friday morning.

Here are some winter safety tips for Louisianans living in FEMA temporary housing units:
  • Stay alert to weather warnings and information on road conditions from state and federal authorities.
  • Use the weather radio to monitor the situation and comply with any local official evacuation orders.
  • Should local officials recommend manufactured housing occupants find sturdier shelter, evacuate immediately. Be sure to take pets with you.
  • Survivors living in travel trailers must leave the trailer in place.
  • To help stay warm, wear layers of loose-fitting, lightweight, warm clothing and a hat.
  • Follow guidelines from the state and FEMA:
    • Conserve propane use prior to cold temperatures.
    • Call the FEMA contracted emergency maintenance number for service if there is a problem with the unit.
      • Maintenance service calls may be delayed by hazardous conditions on roadways.
kiarash.ghiam Thu, 01/20/2022 - 22:36
kiarash.ghiam

Wintry Precipitation Delays Opening at Disaster Recovery Centers Across Louisiana Until 11:30 a.m.

2 days 23 hours ago
Wintry Precipitation Delays Opening at Disaster Recovery Centers Across Louisiana Until 11:30 a.m.

BATON ROUGE, La. – Wintry weather and possibly dangerous road conditions will delay the opening of FEMA Disaster Recovery Centers on Friday, Jan. 21. Centers will now open at 11:30 a.m.

Disaster Recovery Centers will resume regular hours Saturday morning. DRCs are open Monday to Friday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Closed Sundays.

At the centers, survivors can get assistance with their disaster assistance applications, upload documents and have their questions answered about federal disaster assistance.

For a list of all DRCs currently open in Louisiana and other details, visit FEMA.gov/DRC. Or check the FEMA app (under Disaster Resources, select Talk to FEMA in Person). All centers follow COVID-19 precautions. Masks are required for employees, volunteers and survivors. 

kiarash.ghiam Thu, 01/20/2022 - 22:17
kiarash.ghiam

FEMA Teams Assisting Washington Disaster Survivors

3 days 3 hours ago
FEMA Teams Assisting Washington Disaster Survivors

LACEY, WA. – FEMA specialists are working in areas impacted by the Nov. 13-15, 2021 flooding and mudslides to help disaster survivors apply for FEMA assistance and provide information about resources.

FEMA Disaster Survivor Assistance teams (DSA) are working to help residents of Clallam, Skagit and Whatcom counties, including residents of the Lummi Nation, Nooksack Indian Tribe, the Quileute Nation and other tribes in the three counties who were affected by the disaster. The teams carry photo identification and never charge for assistance. FEMA specialists work with survivors to help them apply for assistance, answer questions and process case updates and inquiries.

Specialists currently are in the following location weather permitting:

  • Clallam County: FEMA has an application site at 71 N. Spartan Ave., Forks, operating from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday-Friday and 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday, then ceasing operation.

Residents in the designated counties and tribes can apply online at disasterassistance.gov, by calling 800-621-3362, or by using the FEMA mobile app. If you use a relay service, such as video relay (VRS), captioned telephone or other service, give FEMA the number for that service.

For an accessible video on how to apply for FEMA assistance, go to youtube.com/watch?v=WZGpWI2RCNw.

The Washington State Military Department’s Emergency Management Division leads and coordinates mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery in the state to minimize the impact of disasters and emergencies on the people, property, environment and economy.

For more information about Washington flood and mudslide recovery, visit fema.gov/disaster/4635. Follow the FEMA Region 10 Twitter account at twitter.com/femaregion10.

###

FEMA’s mission is helping people before, during, and after disasters.      

mary.j.edmon Thu, 01/20/2022 - 17:28
mary.j.edmon

Disaster Recovery Centers in Cut Off and Montegut to Close Permanently Jan. 25 and 26

3 days 5 hours ago
Disaster Recovery Centers in Cut Off and Montegut to Close Permanently Jan. 25 and 26

BATON ROUGE, La. – FEMA Disaster Recovery Centers in Cut Off and Montegut will close permanently next week. The DRC in Cut Off will close Tuesday, Jan. 25. The Montegut DRC will close the following day, Wednesday, Jan. 26.

Residents of all parishes affected by Hurricane Ida can continue to visit other DRCs in Louisiana. To locate a center, check the FEMA app or visit www.FEMA.gov/DRC. All centers follow COVID-19 precautions. Masks are required for employees, volunteers and survivors. 

Survivors can meet face to face with FEMA specialists at the following centers until they close permanently.

Closing on Jan. 25 Tarpon Heights Shopping Center

Galliano Government Complex (Parking Lot)

16245 East Main St.

Cut Off, LA 70345

Closes at 6 p.m.

Closing on Jan. 26 Montegut Recreation Center

(Southwest corner of Cross & Dolphin Streets)

106 Dolphin St.

Montegut, LA 70377

Closes at 6 p.m.

kiarash.ghiam Thu, 01/20/2022 - 15:31
kiarash.ghiam

Schedule for Mobile Disaster Recovery Centers

3 days 8 hours ago
Schedule for Mobile Disaster Recovery Centers

FRANKFORT, Ky. – Since the Dec. 12 major disaster declaration for the severe storms and tornadoes, FEMA and the Commonwealth have operated 18 Disaster Recovery Centers in the affected areas of Western Kentucky.

Here are the expected schedules for six mobile recovery centers. Hours are 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. local time on the advertised days:

 

Ohio County: Friday, Jan. 21 to Saturday, Jan. 22.

Community Center/Justice Department, 130 E. Washington, Hartford, KY 42347

 

Lyon County: Friday, Jan. 21 to Tuesday, Jan. 25. Closed Sunday, Jan. 23.

Old Convention Center, 3311 Lee S. Jones Park Road, Eddyville, KY 42038

 

Logan County: Tuesday, Jan. 25 and Wednesday, Jan. 26.

Local County Extension Services, 255 John Paul Road, Russellville KY 4226

 

The following recovery centers open at 8 a.m. Monday, Jan. 24 and will close Tuesday, Jan. 25:

Taylor County: Old Firehouse, 1563 Greensburg Road, Campbellsville, KY 42718

Barren County: Cave City Police Department, 103 Duke St., Cave City, KY 42127

Marion County: 223 N. Spalding Ave., Lebanon, KY 40033

Find a Disaster Recovery Center at fema.gov/drc or call the FEMA Helpline at 800-621-3362.

For information on Kentucky’s recovery from the tornadoes, visit fema.gov/disaster/4630. Follow FEMA on Twitter at FEMA Region 4 (@femaregion4) / Twitter and at facebook.com/fema.

scott.reuter Thu, 01/20/2022 - 13:11
scott.reuter

FEMA Surpasses the Approval of 9,000 Hurricane María Recovery Projects

3 days 9 hours ago
FEMA Surpasses the Approval of 9,000 Hurricane María Recovery Projects

Nearly 80 percent of the projects are for permanent work

Guaynabo, Puerto Rico – The recent number of projects that the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has obligated to the Government of Puerto Rico total more than 9,100. This represents over $25.9 billion in federal funds for Puerto Rico's recovery. Hundreds of projects have already been completed while others are in the bidding and procurement stages.

“These awards represent over $19.4 billion for permanent work in various categories,” said FEMA's Federal Disaster Recovery Coordinator in Puerto Rico, José G. Baquero Tirado. According to FEMA's Director on the island, the obligations will have an impact on the local economy. “Every day we obligate projects with the goal of allocating funds that will benefit the residents of Puerto Rico and their communities.” Baquero Tirado also explained that there are some 1,900 projects that are in various stages of approval by the agency.

For road infrastructure, close to $1.3 billion has been approved for more than 2,600 projects related to roads and bridges. Some roads such as PR-184 in the Rivera sector, Camino los Cotto and cunetón Rancho Vega in Cayey, as well as PR-825 in Cuesta Varo of the Achiote neighborhood in Naranjito will be repaired with about $2 million obligated to each of these municipalities for these purposes.

Among the completed works is the repaving of a rural road in the Mulita neighborhood of the Tita Montañez Sector in Aguas Buenas. In addition, according to the mayor of this municipality, there are over six sectors under construction. Asphalting works have already been completed in the Tajea I and Tajea II sectors. Soon the repairs for the bridge at the Los Coreanos sector and the Los Layos sector will be contracted as well as the repaving of the Casianos sector in the Juan Asencio neighborhood.

“We are pleased because we have elderly people with health conditions and this makes it easier to enter and exit,” said Juan José Guzmán, resident of the Mulita neighborhood.

On the other hand, close to $897 million was approved to cover the costs of some 2,000 projects to repair parks and recreational facilities. In the municipality of Loíza, for example, work was completed on the Santillana del Mar recreational park with an obligation of over $35,000.

“The park is very important for us because it is the meeting point for neighbors and [where] people [can] come and spend time with their families,” said Luis Daniel Pizarro, Director of Federal Programs for the Municipality of Loíza. Afterwards, he added that this completed repair and others will benefit over 3,000 families and different communities.

Likewise, among the 9,000 projects obligated are funds for the University of Puerto Rico. The island's largest educational institution was allocated funds for 182 projects representing $549 million in obligations. For its part, the Puerto Rico Health Department has some 63 projects approved for a total of $104 million for permanent work.

Similarly, about $4.1 billion was obligated for over 2,300 projects to repair public buildings, such as the Lares Cultural Center, which is part of the Institute of Puerto Rican Culture, and six community centers in different neighborhoods in Humacao. Both projects received funding allocations within the first days of the new year.

Manuel A. Laboy Rivera, Executive Director of the Central Office for Recovery, Reconstruction and Resiliency (COR3), said, "Puerto Rico's critical infrastructure is in a historic moment of transformation. The restoration of the electrical and aqueduct systems, as well as the reconstruction of roads, bridges, buildings, parks, schools and ports, among others, will mark the beginning of the Island's socioeconomic development. Currently, 558 permanent works are underway, representing an investment of approximately $373 million. Meanwhile, over 337 projects that represent $14.7 million have been completed, and this year approximately 2,000 projects will begin their respective phases of construction.

For more information on Puerto Rico's recovery from Hurricane María, please visit fema.gov/es/disaster/4339 and recuperacion.pr. Follow our social media pages at Facebook.com/FEMAPuertoRico, Facebook.com/COR3pr and Twitter @COR3pr

frances.acevedo-pico Thu, 01/20/2022 - 12:09
frances.acevedo-pico

Woodruff County, Arkansas Flood Maps Become Final

4 days 2 hours ago
Woodruff County, Arkansas Flood Maps Become Final

DENTON, Texas – New flood maps have been finalized and will become effective on July 19, 2022, for Woodruff County, Arkansas. Residents are encouraged to examine the maps to determine if they are in a low-to-moderate or high-risk flood zone. The current and future Flood Insurance Rate Map can be viewed on FEMA’s Flood Map Changes Viewer at https://msc.fema.gov/fmcv.

By understanding flood risks, individuals can decide which insurance option is best for their situation. Community leaders can use these maps to make informed decisions about building standards and development that will make the community more resilient and lessen the impacts of a flooding event.

Anyone without flood insurance risks uninsured losses to their home, personal property and business. Flood insurance is available either through a private policy or through the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) for those in communities who participate in the NFIP. Residents with federally backed mortgages must have flood insurance if their structures are in the Special Flood Hazard Area.

Contact your local floodplain administrator (FPA) to review the new flood maps and learn more about your risk of flooding. A FEMA Map Specialist can help identify your community FPA and answer questions about the maps as well. Contact them by phone or online chat.

There are cost-saving options available for those newly mapped into a high-risk flood zone. Learn more about your flood insurance options by talking with your insurance agent or visiting https://www.floodsmart.gov.

Carmen.Castro Wed, 01/19/2022 - 19:10
Carmen.Castro

Tornado Survivors Should be Aware of Scammers

4 days 3 hours ago
Tornado Survivors Should be Aware of Scammers

NASHVILLE, Tenn. – Scam artists, identity thieves and other criminals are already descending on survivors from the deadly tornado outbreak that hit western and middle Tennessee on Dec. 10-11, 2021. Federal and state emergency management officials urge residents to watch for and report any suspicious activity.

Many unscrupulous people take advantage of survivors by posing as FEMA representatives, housing inspectors or other official disaster aid workers. Many say they are “just trying to help” survivors complete their applications, but they are trying to obtain personal identity information. Others claim to be contractors only to make promises they don’t keep while pocketing a survivor’s money.

Survivors should keep the following information in mind while FEMA Disaster Assistance Teams, housing inspectors and other officials are working in the area.

  • Federal and local disaster workers do not ask for or accept money. FEMA and U.S. Small Business Administration representatives never charge applicants for disaster assistance, inspections or help filling out applications.
  • Don’t believe anyone who promises a disaster grant in return for a large cash deposit or other payments in full.
  • Be wary of unexpected phone calls or visits to your home from people claiming to be FEMA housing inspectors or people claiming they work for FEMA. The person might ask for your Social Security number and income or banking information. FEMA representatives will have a laminated badge and your FEMA registration number.
  • Protect the privacy of your nine-digit FEMA case/registration number. Legitimate FEMA housing inspectors will NOT ask for this information.
  • Don’t give your banking information to a person claiming to be a FEMA housing inspector. FEMA inspectors are never authorized to collect your personal financial information.

 Fraudulent building contractors

  • Use licensed or verified local contractors with reliable references.
  • To find licensed, certified Tennessee contractors, check the Department of Commerce & Insurance Administration License Roster Search (tn.gov).
  • Don’t pay more than half the costs of repairs in advance and get documentation of your payment.
  • Demand contractors detail the job you expect them to do and ask for a written estimate.

Report the Scam. Reporting helps protect others. Based on the type of scam you may see, contact the appropriate agency.

  • If you believe you or a loved one has become a victim of a scam or identity theft, report it immediately to your local police or sheriff’s department, or contact the office of the Tennessee Attorney General.
  • If you suspect fraud of any kind related to disaster assistance or have knowledge of fraud, waste or abuse, you may report these tips 24 hours a day, seven days a week to the FEMA Disaster Fraud Hotline at (866) 720-5721. You may also email the information to disaster@leo.gov.
  • If someone is using your personal information to open new accounts, make purchases or get a tax refund, report it at IdentityTheft.gov.
  • You may also file a complaint with Tennessee Division of Consumer Affairs if you have been scammed or have a dispute with a business regarding a transaction.

How to Apply for FEMA Assistance

Currently, those affected by the tornado outbreak in Cheatham, Davidson, Dickson, Gibson, Henderson, Henry, Lake, Obion, Stewart, Sumner, Weakley, and Wilson counties may apply for FEMA assistance the following three ways:

  • Online at DisasterAssistance.gov.
  • Call the FEMA Helpline at 800-621-3362 (TTY 800-462-7585). Operators can answer questions about applications already submitted. Lines are open daily from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. local time, seven days a week. If you use a relay service, such as video relay service (VRS), captioned telephone service or others, give FEMA the number for that service.
  • Or, by downloading the FEMA app to a smartphone or tablet

For more information on Tennessee’s disaster recovery, visit www.tn.gov/tema.html and www.fema.gov/disaster/4637. You may also follow FEMA on www.facebook.com/fema and Twitter @FEMARegion4.

felicia.jordan Wed, 01/19/2022 - 17:44
felicia.jordan

Disaster Recovery Center Opens in Skagit County

4 days 4 hours ago
Disaster Recovery Center Opens in Skagit County

LACEY, WA. – FEMA, in partnership with the Washington State Military Department’s Emergency Management Division, will open a Disaster Recovery Center Wednesday, Jan. 19, in Skagit County to help survivors of the November flooding and mudslides.

Center location:

  • Old Sedro-Woolley Library, 802 Ball Street, Sedro-Woolley, WA 98284

The center will open Jan. 19 with hours 9 a.m. – 6 p.m. On Jan. 21, hours will change to Monday to Saturday 9 a.m. – 8 p.m., Sunday noon – 6 p.m.

Recovery specialists from FEMA, the U.S. Small Business Administration and Washington state agencies will be available to help residents of Clallam, Skagit and Whatcom counties, including members of the Lummi Nation, Nooksack Indian Tribe and the Quileute Nation, apply for federal assistance and receive information about help available for homeowners, renters and business owners.

It is not necessary to go to a center to apply for assistance. Residents and tribal members in the designated counties can apply online at disasterassistance.gov, call 800-621-3362, or use the FEMA mobile app. If you use a relay service, such as video relay (VRS), captioned telephone or other service, give FEMA the number for that service.

FEMA financial assistance may include money for temporary housing, basic home repairs or other disaster-related needs such as childcare, transportation and medical, funeral or dental expenses.

For an accessible video on how to apply for FEMA assistance, go to youtube.com/watch?v=WZGpWI2RCNw.

The Washington State Military Department’s Emergency Management Division leads and coordinates mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery in Washington State to minimize the impact of disasters and emergencies on the people, property, environment and economy.

For more information about Washington flood and mudslide recovery, visit fema.gov/disaster/4635. Follow the FEMA Region 10 Twitter account at twitter.com/femaregion10.

###

FEMA’s mission is helping people before, during, and after disasters.      

mary.j.edmon Wed, 01/19/2022 - 16:31
mary.j.edmon

Raceland and Cut Off Disaster Recovery Centers to Close at 2 p.m. Saturdays

4 days 5 hours ago
Raceland and Cut Off Disaster Recovery Centers to Close at 2 p.m. Saturdays

BATON ROUGE, La. – Starting this week, FEMA Disaster Recovery Centers in Raceland and Cut Off will close at 2 p.m. on Saturdays. Survivors can get in-person assistance with their disaster assistance applications, upload documents and get questions answered about federal disaster assistance from 9 a.m.to 6 p.m., Monday to Friday and from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday at:

LPG Government Complex

4876 LA-1

Raceland, LA 70394

Tarpon Heights Shopping Center

16245 East Main St.

Cut Off, LA 70345

For hours and other details, check the FEMA app (under Disaster Resources, select Talk to FEMA in Person) or visit the FEMA DRC Locator for a complete list of DRCs currently open in Louisiana. All centers will follow COVID-19 precautions. Masks will be required by both FEMA specialists and survivors. All centers follow COVID-19 precautions. Masks are required for employees, volunteers and survivors. 

rebecca.watson Wed, 01/19/2022 - 15:58
rebecca.watson
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