FEMA News

 

Click Read more at the bottom of an article's teaser, to display the full article.

Main page content

Mobile Registration Intake Center Open in Mendocino County

6 hours 24 minutes ago
Mobile Registration Intake Center Open in Mendocino County

SACRAMENTO, Calif. – A FEMA Mobile Registration Intake Center is open in Covelo Friday,  Dec. 4, through Sunday, Dec. 6, to serve Mendocino County wildfire survivors.

The intake center is part of the ongoing response and recovery mission for FEMA and the state of California to assist survivors with disaster information.

It is located at Round Valley Public Library, 23925 Howard St., Covelo CA 95428. It will be open 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday, Dec. 4, Saturday, Dec. 5, and Sunday, Dec. 6.

The center is a temporary site to support survivors with disaster information. It offers an optional opportunity for survivors to register, especially those without access to internet or telephone service.

Survivors also may register with FEMA in one of three ways:

  • Online at DisasterAssistance.gov;
  • By downloading the FEMA app to a smartphone or tablet; or
  • By calling the FEMA Helpline at 800-621-3362 (TTY 800-462-7585) between 7 a.m. and 8 p.m. PST. Those who use a relay service such as a videophone, Innocaption or CapTel, should provide FEMA with the specific number assigned to that service when they register.
  • The helpline staff can also answer questions about applications already submitted.
  • Deadline to register for assistance under DR-4558 is Dec. 11, 2020.

Registration enables FEMA to determine residents’ eligibility for financial assistance that may include rent, home repair, home replacement and other serious disaster-related needs such as childcare, transportation and medical, funeral or dental expenses.

For the latest information on wildfire recovery, visit www.fema.gov/disaster/4558. Follow the FEMA Region 9 Twitter account at twitter.com/femaregion9.

###

bree-constance… Thu, 12/03/2020 - 17:20
bree-constance.huffin

One Week Left

7 hours 53 minutes ago
One Week Left

Wildfire Survivors Should Call FEMA Helpline or visit DisasterAssistance.gov by Dec. 11

SACRAMENTO, Calif. – Individuals and households with losses due to August/September wildfires in Butte, Lake, Lassen, Mendocino, Monterey, Napa, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, Solano, Sonoma,  Stanislaus, Trinity, Tulare and Yolo counties have just one week remaining to apply for grants from FEMA or low-interest disaster loans from the U.S. Small Business Administration. The deadline is Dec. 11.

These counties are included in federal Disaster 4558, declared initially Aug. 22 for seven counties and expanded later.

FEMA awards help eligible survivors pay for rent, home repair/replacement and many other serious disaster-related needs, including replacement or repair of vehicles, funeral expenses, medical or dental expenses and miscellaneous other costs. To be reimbursed by FEMA, survivors should photograph damage and save receipts for repair work.

Survivors should contact their insurers and file a claim for the disaster-caused damage before they register with FEMA. Anyone with insurance should register with FEMA even if they aren’t yet certain whether they will be eligible. FEMA may be able to help with costs that insurance doesn’t cover.

The agency can determine eligibility once an applicant’s insurance claim is settled—but there won’t be any FEMA reimbursement for those who fail to register by the Dec. 11 deadline for those who suffered losses in fires including the CZU Lightning Complex, SCU Lighting Complex, August Complex Fire, LNU Lightning Complex, North Complex, Sheep, Dolan and SQF Complex.

There are three ways for survivors to register: online at DisasterAssistance.gov, with the FEMA Mobile App on a smartphone or tablet, or by or by calling the FEMA Helpline at 800-621-3362 (TTY 800-462-7585) between 7 a.m. and 8 p.m. PST. Those who use a relay service such as a videophone, Innocaption or CapTel, should provide FEMA with the specific number assigned to that service when they register. Multilingual services are available on the helpline and specialists can answer most questions about FEMA assistance and registration.

To register you will need the following information:

  • Social Security number
  • Insurance policy information
  • Address of the damaged primary dwelling
  • A description of disaster-caused damage and losses
  • Current mailing address
  • Current telephone number
  • Total household annual income
  • Routing and account number of your checking or savings account (for direct transfer of funds to your bank account)

After you register online or with the FEMA app, you can create your own account. This will enable you to check the status of your application, view messages from FEMA, update your personal information and upload documents that may be necessary to determine your eligibility for aid.

If you are unable to upload your documents, mail them to FEMA at P.O. Box 10055, Hyattsville MD 20782-8055 or fax them to 800-827-8112.

U.S. Small Business Administration

Dec. 11 is also the deadline to apply for a disaster loan from the U.S. Small Business Administration. Grants from FEMA are meant to give eligible survivors a start on their road to recovery. The primary source of recovery funding for many, however, is a loan from the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA), which makes disaster loans to individuals and businesses of all sizes.

Survivors can find out more and apply for a loan at DisasterLoanAssistance.sba.gov/. For additional assistance, contact the SBA’s Virtual Disaster Loan Outreach Center. Customer service representatives are available to assist individuals and business owners, answer questions about SBA’s disaster loan program, explain the application process and help each person complete their electronic loan application. The Virtual DLOC is open 5 a.m. to 5 p.m. PST daily. Call 800-659-2955 or email FOCWAssistance@sba.gov.

These services are only available for the California disaster declaration as a result of the wildfires and not for COVID-19-related assistance.

For the latest information on wildfire recovery, visit www.fema.gov/disaster/4558 and follow the FEMA Region 9 Twitter account at twitter.com/femaregion9.

###

bree-constance… Thu, 12/03/2020 - 15:51
bree-constance.huffin

Free Crisis Counseling is Available for Oregon Residents Affected by Wildfires

9 hours 6 minutes ago
Free Crisis Counseling is Available for Oregon Residents Affected by Wildfires

SALEM, Ore. – The holiday season can be an emotional time, especially for disaster survivors. Feeling sad, stressed or overwhelmed during times like this is normal. Luckily help is just a phone call, and it doesn’t cost a thing.

The Safe+Strong Helpline is available for both children and adults who are struggling with stress, anxiety or other disaster-related depression-like symptoms. For help, call 800-923-4357 or visit safestrongoregon.org/mental-emotional-health. This is a free service provided by the Oregon Health Authority and Portland-based nonprofit agency Lines for Life.

Adults and children having negative thoughts or feelings, can also contact the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s Disaster Distress Helpline at 800-985-5990 (Spanish Press 2), or text “TalkWithUs” to 66746 (for Spanish text “Hablanos” to 66746). This national hotline is toll-free, multilingual, and confidential, offering crisis support to all residents in the United States and its territories.

For more information about who is most at risk for emotional distress from wildfires and to find related resources, visit https://www.samhsa.gov/find-help/disaster-distress-helpline.

Counselors can also provide information about recognizing emotional distress and its effects, coping tips and referrals to other call centers for more support.

To view an accessible video about crisis counseling with closed captioning and American Sign Language interpretation visit https://youtu.be/mrJN1CRBxfE.

###

Disaster recovery assistance is available without regard to race, color, religion, nationality, sex, age, disability, English proficiency or economic status. If you or someone you know has been discriminated against, call FEMA toll-free at 800-621-3362 (TTY 800-462-7585). Those who use a Relay service such as a videophone, InnoCaption or CapTel should update FEMA with their assigned number for that service. They should be aware phone calls from FEMA may come from an unidentified number. Multilingual operators are available. (Press 2 for Spanish)

Disaster survivors affected by the Oregon wildfires and straight-line winds can also get personalized mitigation advice to repair and rebuild safer and stronger from a FEMA Mitigation Specialist. For information on how to rebuild safer and stronger or to inquire as to your new flood risk following a fire near you, email FEMA-R10-MIT@fema.dhs.gov, a FEMA Hazard Mitigation specialist will respond survivor inquiries.

Follow FEMA Region 10 on Twitter and LinkedIn for the latest updates and visit fema.gov for more information.

FEMA's mission is helping people before, during, and after disasters.

issa.mansaray Thu, 12/03/2020 - 14:38
issa.mansaray

FEMA Fire Management Assistance Granted for the Bond Fire

13 hours 23 minutes ago
FEMA Fire Management Assistance Granted for the Bond Fire

OAKLAND, Calif. – The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has authorized the use of federal funds to assist the state of California in combating the Bond Fire burning in Orange County.

On Dec. 3, 2020, the state of California submitted a request for a Fire Management Assistance Grant (FMAG) for the Bond Fire. At the time of the request, the fire threatened approximately 8,500 homes in and around Silverado Canyon, Portola Hills and Foothill Ranch. The fire also threatened power distribution lines, Bee Canyon landfill and methane power plant, Rattlesnake Canyon Reservoir and Saint Michael's Abbey.

The FEMA regional administrator approved the state’s request on Dec. 3, 2020, as the fire threatened to become a major incident.

FMAGs provide federal funding for up to 75 percent of eligible firefighting costs. The Disaster Relief Fund provides allowances for FMAGs through FEMA to assist in fighting fires that threaten to cause major disasters. Eligible costs covered by FMAGs can include expenses for field camps, equipment use, materials, supplies and mobilization, and demobilization activities attributed to fighting the fire.

For more information on FMAGs, visit fema.gov/assistance/public/fire-management-assistance.

###

FEMA’s mission is helping people before, during, and after disasters. Follow FEMA Region 9 online at twitter.com/femaregion9 or view more news releases at fema.gov/fema-regions/region-ix.

robert.barker Thu, 12/03/2020 - 10:21
robert.barker

Public Invited to Appeal or Comment on Flood Maps in Spotsylvania County

1 day 7 hours ago
Public Invited to Appeal or Comment on Flood Maps in Spotsylvania County

FEMA is proposing updates to the Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM) for Spotsylvania County, Virginia. Community stakeholders are invited to participate in a 90-day appeal and comment period.  

The updated maps were produced in coordination with local, state and FEMA officials. Significant community review of the maps has already taken place, but before the maps become final, community stakeholders can identify any concerns or questions about the information provided and submit appeals or comments.  

The 90-day appeal period will begin on or around Dec. 2, 2020. Residents and business owners are also encouraged to review the updated maps to learn about local flood risks and potential future flood insurance requirements.  

Residents may submit an appeal if they perceive that modeling or data used to create the map is technically or scientifically incorrect.  

  • An appeal must include technical information, such as hydraulic or hydrologic data, to support the claim.  

  • Appeals cannot be based on the effects of proposed projects or projects started after the study is in progress. 

  • If property owners see incorrect information that does not change the flood hazard information—such as a missing or misspelled road name in the Special Flood Hazard Area or an incorrect corporate boundary—they can submit a written comment. 

The next step in the mapping process is the resolution of all comments and appeals. Once they are resolved, FEMA will notify communities of the effective date of the final maps. 

Submit appeals and comments by contacting your local floodplain administrator: Kimberly Pomatto, Assistant Director of Zoning/Zoning Administrator, Spotsylvania County, floodplainadministrator@mail.connect.civicplus.com, (540) 515-5487.The preliminary maps may be viewed online at the FEMA Flood Map Changes Viewer: http://msc.fema.gov/fmcv. Changes from the current maps may be viewed online at the Region 3 Changes Since Last FIRM Viewer: http://arcg.is/zHfbW.  

For more information about the flood maps: 

Most homeowner’s insurance policies do not cover flood. There are cost saving options available for those newly mapped into a high-risk flood zone. Learn more about your flood insurance options by talking with your insurance agent and visiting https://www.floodsmart.gov

Spotsylvania County Flood Mapping Milestones 

  • May 28, 2019 — Flood Risk Review Meeting to review draft flood hazard data. 

  • Jan. 31, 2020 — Preliminary Flood Insurance Rate Map released. 

  • March 3, 2020 — Community Coordination and Outreach Meeting to review Preliminary Flood Insurance Rate Map and discuss updates to local floodplain management ordinance and flood insurance. 

  • On or Around Dec. 2, 2020 –Appeal Period starts. 

  • February 2022*— New Flood Insurance Rate Map becomes effective and flood insurance requirements take effect. (*Timeline subject to change pending completion of the appeal review process). 

If you have any questions, please contact FEMA Region 3 Office of External Affairs at (215) 931-5597 or at femar3newsdesk@fema.dhs.gov.  

 

### 

FEMA’s mission is helping people before, during, and after disasters. 

amanda.hancher Wed, 12/02/2020 - 16:44
amanda.hancher

Public Invited to Appeal or Comment on Flood Maps in City of Fredericksburg

1 day 7 hours ago
Public Invited to Appeal or Comment on Flood Maps in City of Fredericksburg

FEMA is proposing updates to the Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM) for the City of Fredericksburg, Virginia. Community stakeholders are invited to participate in a 90-day appeal and comment period.  

The updated maps were produced in coordination with local, state and FEMA officials. Significant community review of the maps has already taken place, but before the maps become final, community stakeholders can identify any concerns or questions about the information provided and submit appeals or comments.  

The 90-day appeal period will begin on or around Dec. 2, 2020. Residents and business owners are also encouraged to review the updated maps to learn about local flood risks and potential future flood insurance requirements.  

Residents may submit an appeal if they perceive that modeling or data used to create the map is technically or scientifically incorrect.  

  • An appeal must include technical information, such as hydraulic or hydrologic data, to support the claim.  

  • Appeals cannot be based on the effects of proposed projects or projects started after the study is in progress. 

  • If property owners see incorrect information that does not change the flood hazard information—such as a missing or misspelled road name in the Special Flood Hazard Area or an incorrect corporate boundary—they can submit a written comment. 

The next step in the mapping process is the resolution of all comments and appeals. Once they are resolved, FEMA will notify communities of the effective date of the final maps. 

Submit appeals and comments by contacting your local floodplain administrator: Tyler Gelles, Senior Stormwater Manager, trgelles@fredericksburgva.gov, (540) 372-1179, Ext 280.The preliminary maps may be viewed online at the FEMA Flood Map Changes Viewer: http://msc.fema.gov/fmcv. Changes from the current maps may be viewed online at the Region 3 Changes Since Last FIRM Viewer: http://arcg.is/1mvffC.   

For more information about the flood maps: 

Most homeowner’s insurance policies do not cover flood. There are cost saving options available for those newly mapped into a high-risk flood zone. Learn more about your flood insurance options by talking with your insurance agent and visiting https://www.floodsmart.gov

City of Fredericksburg Flood Mapping Milestones 

  • May 28, 2019 — Flood Risk Review Meeting to review draft flood hazard data. 

  • Jan. 31, 2020 — Preliminary Flood Insurance Rate Map released. 

  • March 3, 2020 — Community Coordination and Outreach Meeting to review Preliminary Flood Insurance Rate Map and discuss updates to local floodplain management ordinance and flood insurance. 

  • On or Around Dec. 2, 2020 –Appeal Period starts. 

  • February 2022* — New Flood Insurance Rate Map becomes effective and flood insurance requirements take effect. (*Timeline subject to change pending completion of the appeal review process). 

If you have any questions, please contact FEMA Region 3 Office of External Affairs at (215) 931-5597 or at femar3newsdesk@fema.dhs.gov.  

 

### 

FEMA’s mission is helping people before, during, and after disasters. 

amanda.hancher Wed, 12/02/2020 - 16:42
amanda.hancher

FEMA Continues to Support CNMI’s Yutu Recovery

1 day 7 hours ago
FEMA Continues to Support CNMI’s Yutu Recovery

OAKLAND, Calif. ― Two years ago, Super Typhoon Yutu – the strongest storm of 2018, with sustained winds of 175 mph – directly hit the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI). Yutu destroyed critical infrastructure and countless homes on Saipan and Tinian, injured at least 133 and took the lives of two residents.

After such an unprecedented event, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) established a long-term recovery office in Saipan to partner with local, territorial and federal agencies, nongovernmental organizations, the private sector and volunteers to build housing, fund school and infrastructure repairs, and support rebuilding safer and stronger.

A top priority for CNMI and FEMA was to rebuild using methods and materials that can withstand future typhoon and disaster threats. To date, FEMA’s permanent housing construction program has built or repaired typhoon-resistant homes for 102 families. New homes finished through the program incorporate reinforced concrete foundations, walls and roofs. FEMA continues construction and repair work to help another 200 families.

The CNMI also prioritized rebuilding Yutu-damaged schools. FEMA has approved over $45 million to the CNMI Public School System, including recent approvals of $22.6 million for Hopwood Middle School and $2 million for Oleai Elementary School. New school buildings will also include reinforced concrete foundations, walls and roofs to protect the buildings from future storm damage.

As recovery continues, FEMA expects to invest more than $80 million through its Hazard Mitigation Grant Program to fund projects that reduce or eliminate the long-term risk to life and property from future hazards like wind, flooding and other threats. Collectively, we are vested in and committed to CNMI’s long-term recovery plan to restore a functioning, healthy economy, improve infrastructure, expand housing, address environmental considerations, and make CNMI more resistant to future disasters.

###

FEMA’s mission is helping people before, during, and after disasters. Follow FEMA Region 9 online at twitter.com/femaregion9 or view more news releases at fema.gov/fema-regions/region-ix.

robert.barker Wed, 12/02/2020 - 16:21
robert.barker

FEMA to Host Telephone Town Hall Meeting for the Freeport Flood Mitigation Project

1 day 8 hours ago
FEMA to Host Telephone Town Hall Meeting for the Freeport Flood Mitigation Project

CHICAGO - The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Region 5 office in Chicago is hosting a telephone town hall meeting to discuss the Freeport, Ill. flood mitigation project on Wednesday, Dec. 9, 2020, at 4 p.m. CT. FEMA will be hosting the meeting to solicit public feedback as part of its grant application review process.

The City of Freeport applied for FEMA Pre-Disaster Mitigation (PDM) grant funding for the project to acquire and demolish approximately 150 flood prone properties located in the floodway of the Pecatonica River in the Eastside community. The owners of the acquired properties must voluntarily agree to sell the land then the structures will be removed, and the land will be converted to green space by the City of Freeport.

All interested and affected individuals should register to learn more and provide input. The telephone town hall is replacing a public meeting due to the current COVID-19 pandemic and will be simulcast in English and Spanish.

Telephone Town Hall Meeting Details:

  • Date and Time: Dec. 9, 2020 at 4 pm CT.
  • Registration: Visit website: https://tthm.wufoo.com/forms/freeport-flood-mitigation-project-town-hall. Registrants will receive a phone call that will automatically connect them to the meeting. Individuals may also call into the telephone town hall meeting at 888-410-3427 (English language line) or 844-881-1317 (Spanish language line).

To learn more about FEMA’s hazard mitigation assistance, visit www.fema.gov/grants/mitigation. For questions about the meeting or the project, email FEMA-R5-news-desk@fema.dhs.gov or call 312-408-4455.

###

FEMA’s mission is helping people before, during, and after disasters.

troy.christensen Wed, 12/02/2020 - 15:36
troy.christensen

FEMA Releases Survey Results on Harassment and Discrimination within its Workforce

1 day 8 hours ago
FEMA Releases Survey Results on Harassment and Discrimination within its Workforce

WASHINGTON -- Today, the RAND Corporation released results from a 2019 survey requested by FEMA which was designed to estimate the prevalence of workplace harassment and discrimination within the agency.

The survey, focused on the timeframe of spring 2018 through spring 2019, found 20% of FEMA employees reported experiencing a civil rights violation on the basis of sex, and 18.4% of employees reported experiencing a violation on the basis of race or ethnicity. The report also suggests that during this time period women had a less positive experience in the workplace overall, when compared to their male counterparts. Further, the survey identified for the same time period, a gap in trust between employees and agency senior leaders; that employees felt barriers to reporting civil rights violations existed; and that some employees who did report violations or misconduct also indicated experiencing retaliation.

FEMA hired RAND in 2019 as a third-party company to conduct an independent and objective assessment of harassment and discrimination in the organization after an internal investigation discovered allegations of misconduct involving senior leaders. The results of the survey identify areas for improvement and will help continue to guide FEMA leadership decisions on programming and policy responses.

“Even though the data from this survey is more than a year and a half behind us, these findings are alarming and simply not acceptable,” said FEMA Administrator Pete Gaynor. “Our people spend their days helping Americans before, during and after disasters -- and they deserve to work in an environment that makes them feel valued, protected and safe. To address recommendations from the RAND report, we’ve built a Culture Improvement Action Plan that outlines six areas of focus that agency-wide actions will emphasize and advance in the next 12 months.”

The Culture Improvement Action Plan is the latest in a series of actions FEMA leadership team has taken to correct these issues ever since they were discovered. It builds on programs and policies FEMA has instituted over the past two years to combat harassment and misconduct in the workplace, including: establishing an Office of Professional Responsibility to ensure expeditious, fair and objective investigation of allegations of misconduct; conducting mandatory anti-harassment/ civil treatment training courses for employees at all levels; presenting safe space training for employees; providing counseling services for employees; and delivering organizational doctrine with an emphasis on the core values of compassion, fairness, integrity and respect and designed to foster a supportive, healthy and productive environment throughout the organization.

“We also reviewed how we handled allegations of misconduct and the repercussions of such acts, and were able to streamline and improve our processes,” said Karen Filipponi, FEMA Chief Component Human Capital Officer. “When the findings of an OPR investigation are received by our Labor and Employee Relations branch, we ensure they are addressed with the utmost importance and handled fairly and equitably.” 

Jo Linda Johnson, Director of the Office of Equal Rights, says the push to eradicate discrimination and harassment from within FEMA ranks continues.

“We’ve come a long way over the past two years, but we know our work is not done. We’ve hired RAND to do a second survey in 2021, to assess improvements from the 2019 baseline report, and we’ve initiated a Barrier Analysis within FEMA to determine the root cause underlying the experience and opportunities for women in the workforce. Our culture is everyone’s responsibility, but as leaders, it’s on us to understand our employees' lived experiences in the workplace and build an environment of professionalism, dignity and respect.”

zella.campbell Wed, 12/02/2020 - 15:35
zella.campbell

One Tribal Nation Winning Against COVID

1 day 8 hours ago
One Tribal Nation Winning Against COVID

MASHPEE, Massachusetts. –As they do today, ancestors of the Wampanoag Nation walked the land of present-day Massachusetts and Eastern Rhode Island dating back 12,000 years. Tribal members even met traders from Europe and the Mayflower when the pilgrims first came ashore. These stories still resonate in many circles: a pandemic swept through the Tribe, and much like the pandemic of today, the virus was novel and deadly.

In 1616, traders from Europe brought disease to Wampanoag territory. The geographical area affected included all 69 tribes of the Wampanoag Nation from present day Provincetown, Mass., to Narragansett Bay—the boundary of the Wampanoag and Narragansett Nations. Fully two thirds of the entire Wampanoag Nation (estimated at 45,000) died. This also represented a loss of many speakers of the language. Hardest hit were Elders and small children, critical age groups for any language. European disease would also place into jeopardy each tribe’s ability to sustain a population for defense of its territory and culture.

In 1620, the Mayflower arrived in current day Provincetown, Mass., and then moved across Cape Cod Bay to Pahtuksut (current day Plymouth, Mass.) The Wampanoag didn’t approach the Europeans for another three months for fear of more disease being brought ashore.

Following this first three-month period of mitigation efforts, the Mashpee Wampanoag helped the pilgrims regain their health. And in a twist of fate, today, both the Mashpee Wampanoag Nation and the federal government are working together to support tribal members struggling with COVID-19.

The care and protection of the Wampanoag people is as strong as any other nation in the country with more than 2,600 tribal members living in outlying communities near the tribal reservation. Before ‘COVID-19’ became entrenched in our language, tribal leaders were mapping out a plan. The Mashpee Wampanoag was the first Native American tribe in the region and second in the country to establish a COVID strategy. Before President Trump ever declared the pandemic a national emergency, Mashpee Wampanoag Emergency Management Director, Nelson Andrews, Jr., approached the tribal council and asked the Chairman to declare a state of emergency and shut everything down. To protect his fellow tribal members, Andrews wanted to temporarily close the community and government center to all non-essential employees. He then initiated a request to FEMA for direct Federal Assistance. 

Within hours of the Tribe taking action, Capt. Russ Webster, FEMA’s Regional Administrator who also serves as the Federal Coordinating Officer (FCO) for the COVID-19 response, called Andrews. “Throughout history, the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe has been self-sufficient and FEMA respects them as a sovereign nation,” said Webster. “If they have a mission we can support, we’re going to be there,” he added.

Captain Webster immediately sent FCO Adam Burpee to serve as FEMA’s liaison to the Tribal Nation. Burpee’s role, as Webster described it, is connecting people with resources.  “That’s the art and science of emergency management,” he explained.

For the next few months, Andrews and Burpee worked around-the-clock.  FEMA awarded the Mashpee Wampanoag more than $130,000 in Public Assistance grants, which was used to purchase security glass, disinfect the government building, and to provide shelter for the Tribe’s homeless. Meanwhile, Burpee reached out to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for its tribal support units. In what’s known as a “government-to-government relationship,” the CDC sent epidemiologists, a contact tracing team, an infection prevention and control team, and an incident command team to support the Tribe for 60 days. Even with this added support, just after the Fourth of July, the number of COVID cases among tribal members being tested on the reservation jumped by 40 percent. All official Independence Day celebrations and the tribe’s annual Pow-Wow were canceled, though some gatherings were held anyway. The fear for the tribe’s Elders became even more elevated. How could they keep the most revered segment of their population safe, when the Elders were also the least likely to recover if they got the virus?

Andrews felt the first step was to quarantine those infected. “One of the first things I did was to rent a hotel,” he said. “I paid $30,000 (of emergency management funds) up front and asked the manager, ‘Can we use this hotel to quarantine?’ And we put that in place.”

The tribe’s $30,000 was well spent. Infected members readily agreed to protect the rest of the population and stayed in quarantine up to a month. The CDC then worked to get out effective messaging about safety and wearing a mask.

That led many tribal members to seek Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) from the reservation. The Mashpee Wampanoag have an Indian Health Service (IHS) clinic; not all Tribal Nations have one. Even with the clinic, the Tribe had a limited supply of gloves and some coveted N-95 respirator masks. Andrews quickly gained more PPE through federal and non-profit resources, including FEMA.

For example, the FEMA Region 1 warehouse shipped the Tribe roughly 13,000 cloth face coverings, 6,000 procedural masks, 26,000 Nitrile gloves, 5,000 bottles of hand sanitizer, 8,330 N95 respirator masks and 5,370 KN95 respirator masks.  The Salvation Army, the American Red Cross, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, FEMA, and the tribal community all collaborated to distribute these and other much needed supplies.

Although the Tribe’s campaign efforts undoubtedly assisted in curbing an outbreak of the virus, it’s inconclusive to know if any deaths were directly related to the pandemic. “Unless Tribal members are tested at an IHS clinic, there is no way of accurately tracking positivity rates among the tribal community” said Regina Marotto-Benjamin, FEMA Region 1, Tribal Liaison Officer.

Non-IHS facilities do not ask for Tribal membership on registration forms, and even if they do, there is no communication back to the specific Tribe.

“So, any number of Mashpee Wampanoag Tribal members could have been tested and/or treated in any non-IHS facility across the country and the Tribe would not know about it, unless the person self-reports, which is not usually required and difficult to enforce.”

With a second wave approaching this winter, the Tribe plans to be in step with the “new normal.” A phased approach to the Tribe’s re-entry planning is outlined in a document they developed entitled ‘Resilient Comeback.’  It details what this school year will look like, as well as how Tribal Court will function. Plans are underway for the distribution of COVID vaccinations and potential flu season occurring simultaneously.

As this pandemic sweeps the globe, Nelson is confident his tribe remains prepared to stay safe and healthy this winter. With FEMA’s technical support and funding, the agency and the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe will continue their mission together by providing meals and PPE, as well as non-congregate sheltering for its sick and homeless tribal members.

###

 

adrien.urbani Wed, 12/02/2020 - 15:22
adrien.urbani

Two Weeks Left

1 day 8 hours ago
Two Weeks Left

Wildfire survivors should call FEMA Helpine or visit DisasterAssistance.gov by Dec. 16

SACRAMENTO, Calif. – Individuals and households with losses due to the wildfires in Fresno, Los Angeles, Madera, Mendocino, Napa, San Bernardino, San Diego, Shasta, Siskiyou and Sonoma counties have two weeks left to register for assistance from FEMA. The deadline is Dec. 16, 2020.

These counties are included in federal Disaster 4569, declared initially Oct. 16 for seven counties and expanded later.

FEMA monetary awards help eligible survivors pay for rent, home repair/replacement and many other serious disaster-related needs, including replacement or repair of vehicles, funeral expenses, medical or dental expenses and miscellaneous other costs. To be reimbursed by FEMA, survivors should photograph damage and save repair receipts.                 

Survivors should contact their insurers and file a claim for the disaster-caused damage before they register with FEMA. Survivors with insurance should register with FEMA even when they aren’t yet certain whether they will be eligible. FEMA may be able to help with costs that insurance doesn’t cover. The agency can determine eligibility once an applicant’s insurance claim is settled, but there won’t be any FEMA reimbursement for those who fail to register by the Dec. 16 deadline. FEMA cannot pay insurance deductibles.

Survivors can register with FEMA for federal aid in one of three ways:

  • Online at DisasterAssistance.gov;
  • By downloading the FEMA app to a smartphone or tablet; or
  • By calling the FEMA Helpline at 800-621-3362 (TTY 800-462-7585) between 7 a.m. and 8 p.m. PST. Those who use a relay service such as a videophone, Innocaption or CapTel, should provide FEMA with the specific number assigned to that service when they register.

The helpline staff can also answer questions about applications already submitted.

To register you will need the following information:

  • Social Security number
  • Insurance policy information
  • Address of the damaged primary dwelling
  • A description of disaster-caused damage and losses
  • Current mailing address
  • Current telephone number
  • Total household annual income
  • Routing and account number of your checking or savings account (for direct transfer of funds to your bank account)

After you register, FEMA will email you a temporary PIN that you can use to create an account at DisasterAssistance.gov. The account will enable you to check the status of your application, view messages from FEMA, update your personal information and upload documents FEMA may need to determine your eligibility for grants.

If you are unable to upload your documents, mail them to FEMA at P.O. Box 10055, Hyattsville MD 20782-8055 or fax them to 800-827-8112.

Inspections

During COVID-19, inspections for damaged homes will be conducted by phone. Remote inspections are comparable to traditional, in-person inspections and can expedite recovery assistance, based on eligibility. For security purposes, the inspector will verify your identity by asking a series of qualifying questions and then provide you with the first four digits of your application number to complete verification.

If you reported that you cannot safely live in your home, a FEMA inspector will contact you by phone and ask about the type and extent of damage sustained. Survivors with minimal damage who can live in their homes will not automatically be scheduled for a home inspection when applying to FEMA, but FEMA will provide an inspection if the survivor contacts the agency to report finding more damage than originally reported. Inspectors record damage; they have no role in determining the amount or type of grants a survivor may receive.

Remote inspections don’t affect the FEMA Other Needs Assistance program. This assistance does not require an inspection and includes possible awards for childcare, transportation, medical, dental, funeral expenses, replacement of personal property, or moving and storage assistance.

FEMA will perform remote inspections even if it can’t verify an applicant’s identity, primary residence or home ownership through automated records searches performed as part of the application process. FEMA will send a letter to applicants requesting documents they must provide to be considered for assistance after the inspeciton. Inspectors are not allowed to collect documentation from applicants.

U.S. Small Business Administration

Dec. 16 is also the deadline to apply for a disaster loan from the U.S. Small Business Administration. Grants from FEMA are meant to give eligible survivors a start on their road to recovery. The primary source of recovery funding for many, however, is a loan from the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA), which makes disaster loans to individuals and businesses of all sizes.

Survivors can find out more and apply for a loan at DisasterLoanAssistance.sba.gov/. For additional assistance, contact the SBA’s Virtual Disaster Loan Outreach Center. Customer service representatives are available to assist individuals and business owners, answer questions about SBA’s disaster loan program, explain the application process and help each person complete their electronic loan application. The Virtual DLOC is open 5 a.m. to 5 p.m. PST daily. Call 800-659-2955 or email FOCWAssistance@sba.gov.

These services are only available for the California disaster declaration as a result of the wildfires and not for COVID-19-related assistance.

For the latest information on wildfire recovery, visit www.fema.gov/disaster/4569 and follow the FEMA Region 9 Twitter account at twitter.com/femaregion9.

###

bree-constance… Wed, 12/02/2020 - 14:58
bree-constance.huffin

Floods Follow Fires Those at Risk of Mudflows Encouraged to Buy Flood Insurance

1 day 8 hours ago
Floods Follow Fires Those at Risk of Mudflows Encouraged to Buy Flood Insurance

SACRAMENTO, Calif. – Having survived a tough season of wildfires, many California property owners must now contend with the risk of flooding and mudflow as a consequence of the compromised landscapes in the burn scars. Wildfires destroy vegetation that supports and strengthens hillsides. Without plants to hold the earth in place, even a small amount of rain can start a mudflow. This can happen quickly and with little warning.

Property owners don’t have to bear all the risk themselves, because mudflow coverage is part of a standard policy from FEMA’s National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). 

Mudflow is covered subject to the definition of flooding in the NFIP Standard Flood Insurance Policy (SFIP). The SFIP defines mudflow as "a river of liquid and flowing mud on the surfaces of normally dry land areas, as when earth is carried by a current of water.” A complete copy of the NFIP policy, including the definition of flooding and mudflow, is available here.

Mudflows are sudden, costly and destructive. Unfortunately, the recent wildfires have increased the risk of mudflow for anyone whose home is downhill from a fire-scorched area. That increased risk lasts for several years until enough new vegetation takes root.

Take action now and protect yourself with an NFIP policy, which offers flood insurance coverage to property owners, renters and business owners. The maximum coverage available for a residential building is $250,000  and $100,000 for contents. Non-residential (commercial) structures are eligible for  maximum coverage of $500,000 on the building and $500,000 on contents.  For additional information and to purchase an NFIP policy, contact your insurance agent today.

Generally, there is a 30-day waiting period before an NFIP policy becomes effective. Those at risk of flooding or mudflows are encouraged to buy flood insurance now as winter rains will soon be here.

For more information on the NFIP or to locate an insurance agent, you may contact the Help Center at:  877-336-2627 or visit: FloodSmart.gov.

Dec. 16 is the aid registration deadline for survivors of wildfires in 10 counties included in the Disaster 4569 declaration for September fires. The counties are Fresno, Los Angeles, Madera, Mendocino, Napa, San Bernardino, San Diego, Shasta, Siskiyou and Sonoma. Even if you have insurance, please consider registering with FEMA before the deadline. Federal assistance may be available to meet outstanding needs not met by insurance.

For the latest information on wildfire recovery, visit www.fema.gov/disaster/4569 and follow the FEMA Region 9 Twitter account at twitter.com/femaregion9.

###

bree-constance… Wed, 12/02/2020 - 14:51
bree-constance.huffin

Laura Survivors: Appeal Determination Letters for Temporary Housing

1 day 9 hours ago
Laura Survivors: Appeal Determination Letters for Temporary Housing

BATON ROUGE, La. — Hurricane Laura survivors who live in parishes designated for Direct Temporary Housing assistance and who have been denied temporary housing assistance can appeal that decision. Survivors have 60 days from the date of their determination letter to appeal that decision. However, the deadline to be referred for direct temporary housing assistance is Dec. 31, 2020.

Applicants who have not received a call from FEMA to discuss their eligibility for direct temporary housing options and feel this is in error are encouraged to submit an appeal to FEMA with supporting documentation to prove their home is uninhabitable due to major damage or complete destruction caused by Hurricane Laura.

Insured applicants are required to submit denial or settlement documentation to FEMA as soon as possible if their insurance claim was denied or insufficient and their home is not habitable.

Determination Letters

It’s important to read the determination letter carefully to identify the reason for being declared ineligible. Some common reasons include:  

 

  • The home is insured and the applicant needs to provide a settlement or denial to be considered for assistance. 
  • Additional information is needed from the survivor to prove identify, ownership, and/or occupancy of the damaged home. 
  • There were multiple registrations using the same address. 
  • Damage to a secondary residence (where the survivor lives less than six months of the year). 
  • The home is safe to occupy because FEMA records indicate minimal or no damage to the home. 
  • Missed inspections and no follow-up communication with FEMA. 
  • FEMA is unable to contact the applicant. 

Habitability

A habitable home is one that is safe, sanitary, functional and presents no disaster-caused hazards to the occupants. FEMA regulations define safe as secure from disaster-related hazards or threats to occupants; sanitary as free of disaster-related health hazards; and functional as an item or home capable of being used for its intended purpose. 

A FEMA inspection determines if home repairs are necessary to ensure the safety or health of occupants or to make the residence functional. FEMA considers the following factors when determining habitability and awarding repair assistance: 

  • The exterior is structurally sound including windows, doors, and roof; 
  • The utilities are functional including electricity, gas, heat, plumbing, etc.; 
  • The interior is structurally sound including floors, walls, and ceilings; 
  • There is safe access to and from the home; 
  • The septic and sewer systems are functioning properly; and 
  • The water supply or well (if applicable) is functional. 

 

Disaster-caused damage may exist without making the home uninhabitable. Although minimal damage may cause some inconvenience, it is expected that individuals or households will address those losses without federal assistance.

Determining Habitability 

For Hurricane Laura, FEMA utilized multiple methods for verifying habitability. Phone interviews were conducted by experienced FEMA inspectors and for those identified as uninhabitable an exterior validation was also completed at the home. FEMA also utilized technology, such as satellite imagery and information from the State Fire Marshall to make these determinations. 

Appealing FEMA’s Decision 

If you feel the amount or type of assistance is incorrect, you may submit a signed, written explanation outlining why you believe FEMA’s decision is incorrect, as well as copies of any documents supporting your appeal and proving your disaster losses. Your appeal letter to FEMA must be submitted within 60 days of your decision letter and must state that you are asking for reconsideration of the specific decision and explain in detail why the appeal is being filed. 

There are four ways you can submit your letter and documents. Be sure to include the cover letter you received from FEMA—with any letters you submit. 

Mail to the address below.  

  • FEMA National Processing Service Center 
  • P.O. Box 10055 
  • Hyattsville, MD 20782-7055 

 

  • Fax to 800-827-8112. 
  • Upload at disasterassistance.gov if you have a FEMA online account. To set up a FEMA online account, visit the site and click on “Check Your Application and Log In” and follow the directions. 
  • Visit a FEMA Disaster Recovery Center, which is under strict COVID-19 protocols to ensure the safety of all participants. Masks or face coverings are required for entry and service. Find your closest center by calling the FEMA helpline at 800-621-3362 (TTY: 800-462-7585), going online to disasterassistance.gov or downloading the FEMA app. 

Those who use a relay service such as a videophone, InnoCaption or CapTel should update FEMA with their specific number assigned to that service. 

For the latest information on Hurricane Laura, visit https://www.fema.gov/disaster/4559

scott.reuter Wed, 12/02/2020 - 14:37
scott.reuter

State, FEMA Continue Work on Hurricane Sally Recovery in Florida

1 day 12 hours ago
State, FEMA Continue Work on Hurricane Sally Recovery in Florida

Federal Funding Totals $204.9 Million

PENSACOLA, Fla. – The deadline for individuals and households to apply for FEMA disaster assistance has passed, but work on Florida’s recovery from Hurricane Sally continues.

Survivors in Bay, Escambia, Okaloosa, Santa Rosa and Walton counties who registered with FEMA can check the status of their applications, ask questions and get information in several ways:

  • By visiting DisasterAssistance.gov
  • Using the FEMA App for smartphones
  • Calling 800-621-3362 (800-462-7585 TTY). Multilingual operators are available. Those who use a relay service such as a videophone, InnoCaption or CapTel should provide FEMA with their specific phone number assigned to that service.

Survivors who were unable to register before the deadline and who can provide justification for late registration may contact FEMA and request consideration for disaster assistance.

As of Dec. 1, 2020, $204.9 million in federal grants, loans and flood insurance payments have been approved for homeowners, renters and businesses in the five counties. This includes:

  • $29.2 million in FEMA grants for 7,154 individuals and households.
  • $64.7 million in disaster loans from the U.S. Small Business Administration for 1,644 businesses, homeowners and renters.
  • 4,459 National Flood Insurance Program claims filed; $111 million paid to policyholders.

FEMA Disaster Survivor Assistance teams helped more than 2,400 residents register for FEMA assistance and provided more than 4,600 referrals to other agencies and voluntary organizations for unmet needs.

FEMA continues to coordinate with the State of Florida on reimbursement for emergency services, debris removal and repair or replacement of damaged public infrastructure, and for funding to mitigate against losses from future storms.

For more information about Hurricane Sally recovery in Florida, visit the FEMA disaster webpage at https://www.fema.gov/disaster/4564 or the Florida Division of Emergency Management webpage at https://www.floridadisaster.org/info/Sally/.

###

FEMA’s mission: Helping people before, during, and after disasters

barbara.murien… Wed, 12/02/2020 - 11:16
barbara.murienterivera

FEMA Application Deadline Has Passed but Help Still Available for Oregon Wildfire Survivors

2 days 4 hours ago
FEMA Application Deadline Has Passed but Help Still Available for Oregon Wildfire Survivors

SALEM, Ore. – The Nov. 30 deadline to apply for FEMA disaster assistance has passed, but help is still available for wildfire survivors as FEMA continues working with the Oregon Office of Emergency Management.

Oregon homeowners and renters who applied for FEMA disaster assistance have the right to appeal FEMA’s eligibility decisions. Survivors who don’t agree with FEMA’s eligibility decision may file an appeal within 60 days of receiving their letter, even though the application deadline has passed. To learn more about the appeals process, including what to include and how to file an appeal visit https://go.usa.gov/x77EB. Appeals must be made in writing explaining why the agency should re-evaluate its decision and sent to FEMA by mail, fax or uploading to your online FEMA account.

Keep in touch with FEMA

Applicants should stay in touch with FEMA to ensure the disaster assistance process stays on track. Missing or incorrect information could result in delays in receiving assistance. Update contact information, report additional home damage or a delay in insurance claims in the following ways:

  • Going online at DisasterAssistance.gov
  • Downloading the FEMA app
  • Calling the FEMA Helpline 800-621-3362 (TTY: 800-462-7585). Multilingual operators are available 7 a.m. to 10 p.m., seven days a week.
  • Those who use a Relay service, such as a videophone, Innocaption or CapTel, should provide their specific number assigned to that service. It is important that FEMA is able to contact you. Phone calls from FEMA may come from an unidentified number.
  • While the deadline to apply with FEMA has passed, late applications may be accepted on a case-by-case basis.

 Buy Flood Insurance Now

Oregonians who live in and around areas impacted by the wildfires face an increased risk of flooding for up to several years after the disaster. If you haven’t already purchased a flood insurance policy, it’s important to consider buying it now. It takes 30 days after applying for a new National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) insurance policy to go into effect. For more about information on FEMA’s NFIP, visit FloodSmart.gov. If you are ready to buy flood insurance, go to FloodSmart.gov/flood-insurance/buy. To find a flood insurance provider near you, visit FloodSmart.gov/flood-insurance/providers. Twenty-five providers were listed for Oregon as of Nov. 25. Many have toll-free phone numbers. Before rebuilding, homeowners should contact their local building official and/or floodplain manager to make sure all building requirements are met.

SBA Disaster Loans

The Nov. 30 application deadline for homeowners, renters and businesses for a U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) low-interest disaster loan for home or business physical damage has also passed. In some circumstances, however, applications may be accepted after the deadline on a case-by-case basis. For more information, call 800-659-2955 (TTY: 800-877-8339) 5 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily, email questions to FOCWAssistance@sba.gov or visit sba.gov/disaster. The application deadline for businesses and private nonprofit organizations for a loan for economic injury is June 15, 2021. Applicants can complete an online application at https://disasterloan.sba.gov/ela/.

Free Home Repair Advice

All Oregon residents – including disaster survivors affected by the wildfires and straight-line winds – can still get personalized mitigation advice from a FEMA Hazard Mitigation Specialist.   For information on how to build safer and stronger or to inquire about your flood risk following a fire, email FEMA-R10-MIT@fema.dhs.gov and a FEMA Hazard Mitigation Specialist will respond. This is a free service.

Free Crisis Counseling is Available

Need to talk? The Safe+Strong Helpline is available for both children and adults who are struggling with stress, anxiety or other disaster-related depression-like symptoms. For help, call 800-923-4357 or visit safestrongoregon.org/mental-emotional-health.

Disaster Legal Assistance

Disaster Legal Services is taking questions from wildfire survivors. Go to: oregondisasterlegalservices.org, or call 800-452-7636 or 503-684-3763, Monday through Friday 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Disaster Case Management

Community members who are enrolled in local/state/tribal and/or federal programs providing case management are encouraged to reach out to and stay in touch with their providers throughout their recovery.

211info

211info is a nonprofit organization funded by state and municipal contracts, foundations, United Ways, donations and community partners in Oregon and Southwest Washington.

211info empowers Oregon and Southwest Washington communities by helping people identify, navigate and connect with the local resources they need. To speak with a community information specialist about resources in your area: call 211 or 866-698-6155; text your zip code to 898211; or email help@211info.org. Representatives are available 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Friday.

###

The SBA is the federal government’s primary source of money for the long-term rebuilding of disaster-damaged private property. SBA helps businesses of all sizes, private non-profit organizations, homeowners, and renters fund repairs or rebuilding efforts and cover the cost of replacing lost or disaster-damaged personal property. These disaster loans cover losses not fully compensated by insurance or other recoveries and do not duplicate benefits of other agencies or organizations. For more information, applicants may contact SBA’s Disaster Assistance Customer Service Center by calling (800) 659-2955, emailing disastercustomerservice@sba.gov, or visiting SBA’s website at sba.gov/disaster. Deaf and hard-of-hearing individuals may call (800) 877-8339.

Disaster recovery assistance is available without regard to race, color, religion, nationality, sex, age, disability, English proficiency or economic status. If you or someone you know has been discriminated against, call FEMA toll-free at 800-621-3362 (TTY 800-462-7585). Those who use a Relay service such as a videophone, InnoCaption or CapTel should update FEMA with their assigned number for that service. They should be aware phone calls from FEMA may come from an unidentified number. Multilingual operators are available. (Press 2 for Spanish)

Follow FEMA Region 10 on Twitter and LinkedIn for the latest updates and visit fema.gov for more information.

FEMA's mission is helping people before, during, and after disasters.

 

issa.mansaray Tue, 12/01/2020 - 19:43
issa.mansaray

FEMA approves $11.9 million for Hurricane Michael recovery expenses

2 days 10 hours ago
FEMA approves $11.9 million for Hurricane Michael recovery expenses

PANAMA CITY, Fla. FEMA has approved two projects totaling more than $11.9 million for the state of Florida to reimburse Gadsden District Schools and the city of Tallahassee for Hurricane Michael recovery work.

Gadsden District Schools is receiving $1,404,477 for permanent repairs to Shanks Middle School campus, including removing and replacing hurricane-damaged roofing, insulation, windows and lighting fixtures. Additionally, funds cover the costs of hurricane-damaged contents at Shanks Middle School, such as athletic equipment.

Tallahassee is receiving $10,561,390 for repairs to its hurricane-damaged electrical grids. Funds cover repairs to electrical power poles, power distribution lines and transformers throughout the city caused by high winds, rain and flooding.

These grants are funded by FEMA’s Public Assistance program, an essential source of funding for communities recovering from a federally declared disaster or emergency. The Florida Division of Emergency Management (FDEM) works with FEMA during all phases of the program and reviews projects prior to FEMA final approval.

Applicants work directly with FEMA to develop projects and scopes of work. FEMA obligates funding for projects to FDEM after final approval.

Once a project is obligated, FDEM works closely with applicants to finalize grants and begin making payments. FDEM has implemented new procedures designed to ensure grant funding is provided to local communities as quickly as possible.

FEMA’s Public Assistance program provides grants to state, tribal and local governments, and certain private nonprofit organizations, including houses of worship, so communities can quickly respond to and recover from major disasters or emergencies.

###

FEMA’s mission: Helping people before, during, and after disasters.

barbara.murien… Tue, 12/01/2020 - 13:13
barbara.murienterivera

Delta Deadline to Register for FEMA Assistance is December 16

2 days 11 hours ago
Delta Deadline to Register for FEMA Assistance is December 16

BATON ROUGE, La. — Renters and homeowners in parishes designated for FEMA assistance after Hurricane Delta have until Dec. 16 to register for help.

Federal assistance includes help for temporary housing, rental assistance and repair or replacement of damaged property.

Additionally, grants may be available to help with other expenses such as medical and dental care, childcare, funeral and burial costs, replacing essential household items, moving and storage, vehicle repairs and cleanup.

Survivors who live in the following parishes that have been designated for this disaster may be eligible: Acadia, Beauregard, Calcasieu, Cameron, Jefferson Davis, Lafayette, St. Landry, St. Martin, Rapides and Vermilion.

For more information or to register for assistance:

  • Call the FEMA Helpline at 800-621-3362 (TTY at 800-877-8339).
  • Visit the FEMA website disasterassistance.gov/.
  • To find a drive-thru DRC you can text 43362 and type DRC and your ZIP Code (i.e. DRC 12345).
  • To receive a link to download the FEMA app:
  • Apple devices: text APPLE to 43362 
  • Android devices: text ANDROID to 43362
  • Visit fema.gov/about/news-multimedia/app
  • Call 211 or text 527435837 to 898-211. Those who use a relay service such as a videophone, InnoCaption or CapTel should update FEMA with their specific number assigned to that service.

For the latest information on Hurricane Laura, visit fema.gov/disaster/4559. Or, for Hurricane Delta, visit fema.gov/disaster/4570. Follow the FEMA Region 6 Twitter account at twitter.com/FEMARegion6

scott.reuter Tue, 12/01/2020 - 12:25
scott.reuter

FEMA Approves More Than $3 Million for Maine COVID-19 Costs

2 days 12 hours ago
FEMA Approves More Than $3 Million for Maine COVID-19 Costs

REGION I – Maine will receive $3,353,905 from the FEMA for the cost of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) for testing and care for the public due to COVID-19. The grant is awarded to the State as reimbursement for Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) including disposable non-sterile isolation gowns and disposable isolation suits.

The Maine Department of Health and Human Services and Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention distributed the PPE in response to emergency needs from organizations such as first responders, long-term care facilities, frontline caregivers, and others involved in the state’s COVID-19 response. Additionally, the Maine Department of Administrative and Financial Services distributed the PPE to essential State employees.

It is funded through FEMA’s Public Assistance (PA) Grant program which reimburses communities for actions taken in the immediate response and during recovery from a disaster, allowing them to quickly move forward.  Eligible applicants include states, federally recognized tribal governments, U.S. territories, local governments, and certain private non-profit organizations. The grant applications are submitted from the state, which coordinates the process with local governments. 

“FEMA’s Public Assistance grant program is essential to helping communities recovering from a federally declared disaster get back on their feet,” said Regional Administrator and Federal Coordinating Officer Captain Russ Webster, who oversees FEMA’s operations in Maine. The Maine Emergency Management Agency works with FEMA during all phases of the PA program and conducts final reviews of FEMA-approved projects.

“This funding is just one of the positive results of the partnership between FEMA and the State of Maine through Maine Emergency Management Agency,” concluded Webster.

FEMA obligates funding for this project directly to the state of Maine.

Additional information about FEMA’s Public Assistance program can be found at https://www.fema.gov/public-assistance-local-state-tribal-and-non-profit.

###

FEMA’s mission is helping people before, during, and after disasters

adrien.urbani Tue, 12/01/2020 - 11:25
adrien.urbani

FEMA Approves More Than $1 Million for Vermont COVID-19 Costs

2 days 14 hours ago
FEMA Approves More Than $1 Million for Vermont COVID-19 Costs

REGION I Vermont will receive $1,393,160 from FEMA for costs incurred by Vermont Department of Public Safety for the purchase of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) and bulk supplies in response to the COVID-19 Public Health Emergency. The materials were stored in a warehouse and distributed throughout the state in an ongoing basis.

This grant is funded through FEMA’s Public Assistance (PA) Grant program which reimburses communities for actions taken in the immediate response and during recovery from a disaster. Eligible applicants include states, federally recognized tribal governments, U.S. territories, local governments, and certain private non-profit organizations. The grant applications are submitted from the state, which coordinates the process with local governments.

“FEMA’s Public Assistance grant program is essential in helping communities recovering from a federally declared disaster get back on their feet,” said Regional Administrator and Federal Coordinating Officer Captain Russ Webster, who oversees FEMA’s operations in Vermont. Vermont Emergency Management works with FEMA during all phases of the PA program and conducts final reviews of FEMA-approved projects.

“This funding is just one of the positive results of the partnership between FEMA and the State through Vermont Emergency Management,” concluded Webster.

FEMA’s Public Assistance program provides grant funding to state and local governments, and certain types of private non-profit organizations, so that communities can quickly respond to and recover from major disasters or emergencies. FEMA obligates funding for this project directly to the state of Vermont.

Additional information about FEMA’s Public Assistance program can be found at https://www.fema.gov/public-assistance-local-state-tribal-and-non-profit.

 ###

FEMA’s mission is helping people before, during, and after disasters

 

adrien.urbani Tue, 12/01/2020 - 09:06
adrien.urbani

Disaster Unemployment Assistance Available for Those Affected by Tropical Storm Isaías

3 days 14 hours ago
Disaster Unemployment Assistance Available for Those Affected by Tropical Storm Isaías

GUAYNABO, Puerto Rico – The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) announced that employees or self-employed individuals who live in Aguada, Hormigueros, Mayagüez or Rincón and became unemployed as a direct consequence of Tropical Storm Isaías may be eligible to receive Disaster Unemployment Assistance (DUA).

Survivors that live in the four affected municipalities can file a claim until Dec. 30, 2020. To be eligible for Disaster Unemployment Assistance, the applicant must:

  • File a regular unemployment insurance claim and be determined ineligible for benefits;
  • Be unemployed or partially unemployed as a direct result of the disaster;
  • Be able and available for work, unless injured as a direct result of the disaster;
  • File an application for DUA within 30 days of the date of this announcement; and
  • Have not refused an offer of employment in a suitable position.

Survivors can find the DUA application at trabajo.pr.gov. Applications can be can placed in the mail box located at the nearest Puerto Rico Department of Labor office, from Monday to Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., or uploaded at trabajo.pr.gov/DocUploader

To receive DUA benefits, all required documentation must be submitted to the Puerto Rico Department of Labor within 21 days from the day the DUA application is filed. Required documentation may include Social Security number, a copy of the most recent federal income tax return, check stubs or documentation to support that applicants were working or self-employed when the disaster occurred.

To verify eligibility and additional information on DUA, survivors must visit their local unemployment office or visit trabajo.pr.gov. DUA is managed by the Puerto Rico Department of Labor and funded by FEMA. Survivors may also search for employment and training opportunities through the American Job Center or by visiting CareerOneStop.org/LocalHelp.  

For more information on Puerto Rico’s recovery from Tropical Storm Isaías, visit fema.gov/disaster/4560. Follow us at Facebook.com/FEMAPuertoRico.

 

frances.acevedo-pico Mon, 11/30/2020 - 09:18
frances.acevedo-pico
Checked
2 hours 58 minutes ago
Subscribe to FEMA News feed
Aggregator Taxonomy