Lower Colorado River Authority (TX) News

 

Click Read more at the bottom of an article's teaser, to display the full article.

Main page content

LCRA, wholesale electric customers offering grants of up to $50,000 for community projects

2 weeks 4 days ago

AUSTIN, Texas – The Lower Colorado River Authority and its wholesale electric customers are offering grants of up to $50,000 for community projects throughout LCRA’s wholesale power, water and transmission service territory.

Applications for this round of Community Development Partnership Program grants are available online in July and must be submitted by midnight on July 31. Most grants are for $25,000 or less, but each grant cycle includes awards of several grants of up to $50,000. Applicants requesting more than $5,000 in grant funding must supply matching funds of at least 20 percent of the total project cost.

Eligible organizations include volunteer fire departments, emergency responders, local governments, schools, libraries, civic groups, museums and other nonprofit organizations. The grants are not available to individuals, for-profit entities, professional associations, social service projects or limited-use facilities.

Organizations in LCRA’s wholesale electric or water service areas have been eligible for CDPP grants in the past. Beginning in July, LCRA will expand grant eligibility to organizations in areas in which LCRA Transmission Services Corporation provides transmission services.

Organizations in all or part of the following counties are eligible for CDPP grants: Aransas, Austin, Bandera, Bastrop, Blanco, Brown, Burleson, Burnet, Caldwell, Callahan, Cameron, Coke, Coleman, Colorado, Comal, Concho, Coryell, Crane, Crockett, Culberson, DeWitt, Dimmit, Eastland, Ector, Edwards, Fayette, Gillespie, Goliad, Gonzales, Guadalupe, Hamilton, Harris, Hays, Hidalgo, Karnes, Kendall, Kerr, Kimble, Kinney, Lampasas, Lavaca, Lee, Llano, Mason, Matagorda, Maverick, McCulloch, Medina, Menard, Midland, Mills, Nolan, Nueces, Pecos, Real, San Patricio, San Saba, Schleicher, Starr, Sterling, Sutton, Taylor, Terrell, Tom Green, Travis, Upton, Uvalde, Val Verde, Waller, Washington, Wharton and Williamson. See lcra.org/cdpp for more information on eligibility requirements.

In the most recent round of grants, LCRA and its wholesale electric customers earlier this year awarded more than $525,000 to fund 28 projects, ranging from providing life-saving equipment to first responders to upgrading community halls to improving parks and Little League fields.

To date, LCRA and its wholesale electric customers have awarded 1,768 community grants totaling more than $46 million. When combined with the nearly $226 million in community-raised matching funds, the total investment in local projects reaches almost $272 million.

Applications and eligibility requirements are available at lcra.org/cdpp or by calling the program administrator at 800-776-5272, ext. 3140.

About LCRA
The Lower Colorado River Authority serves customers and communities throughout Texas by managing the lower Colorado River; generating and transmitting electric power; providing a clean, reliable water supply; and offering outdoor adventures at more than 40 parks along the Colorado River from the Texas Hill Country to the Gulf Coast. LCRA and its employees are committed to fulfilling our mission to enhance the quality of life of the Texans we serve through water stewardship, energy and community service. LCRA was created by the Texas Legislature in 1934 and receives no state appropriations. For more information, visit lcra.org.

Media Contact
Clara Tuma
512–578–3292
clara.tuma@lcra.org

LCRA awards $14,094 grant for water recycling projects in Spicewood

1 month 1 week ago

BURNET COUNTY, Texas – Windermere Oaks Water Supply Corporation in Spicewood will implement two important water recycling projects with help from a $14,094 grant from the Lower Colorado River Authority.

The cost-share grant will help Windermere Oaks WSC complete a $48,375 project to recycle about 50 percent of backwash water at its water treatment plant and begin using recycled water in the disinfection process at its wastewater treatment plant.

“Backwash water recycling will help reduce the amount of water we have to take out of Lake Travis,” said George Burriss, Windermere Oaks WSC general manager. “It’s good for us, the folks downstream and for the river.”

“The recycling project at the wastewater plant will allow us to save a couple thousand gallons of fresh potable water by using recycled wastewater during the chlorine disinfection process,” Burriss said. “Currently, the water being used is taken directly from the main water system.”

The two recycling projects are estimated to save about 12 acre-feet a year, or about 4 million gallons. Windermere Oaks WSC serves 263 retail customers.

"We calculated that this project will deliver an annual 3 percent savings in terms of the treated water we won't use under our contract with LCRA,” said Joe Gimenez, Windermere Oaks WSC board president. “These types of money- and water-saving projects warrant significant attention by non-profit corporations like ours. Reinvestments in operational efficiency are hard to come by and we appreciate LCRA enabling such a meaningful opportunity."

John Hofmann, LCRA executive vice president of Water, said LCRA is proud to support water conservation efforts such as the new projects at Windermere Oaks WSC.

“We applaud Windermere Oaks WSC for pursuing these projects,” Hofmann said. “This isn’t a huge project in terms of the amount of water saved, but it’s a perfect example of how we should all be looking for ways to conserve and use recycled water whenever we can. We encourage other local water suppliers to look for similar ways to use water more efficiently.”

Burriss said he is grateful for the grant and looks forward to the projects becoming a reality.

“This grant is a really good thing, and it helps us do a better job,” Burriss said. “Even though we buy our water from LCRA, they are helping us promote conservation and reduce waste. We appreciate what they are doing for us.”

The grants are awarded through LCRA's Firm Water Conservation Cost-Share Program, which provides funding for water efficiency projects and programs established by LCRA's firm water customers. Customers include cities, utilities, industries, irrigation and recreational water users. Projects funded through the program can include converting irrigated areas using raw or potable water to recycled water, and decreasing utility system water loss through flushing reductions, leak detection and repair, or other efforts.

About LCRA
The Lower Colorado River Authority serves customers and communities throughout Texas by managing the lower Colorado River; generating and transmitting electric power; providing a clean, reliable water supply; and offering outdoor adventures at more than 40 parks along the Colorado River from the Texas Hill Country to the Gulf Coast. LCRA and its employees are committed to fulfilling our mission to enhance the quality of life of the Texans we serve through water stewardship, energy and community service. LCRA was created by the Texas Legislature in 1934 and receives no state appropriations. For more information, visit lcra.org.

Media Contact
Clara Tuma
512–578–3292
clara.tuma@lcra.org







LCRA, wholesale electric customers award more than $525,000 in community grants

1 month 2 weeks ago

AUSTIN, Texas – The Lower Colorado River Authority and its wholesale electric customers recently awarded more than $525,000 in community development grants for projects throughout the LCRA wholesale electric and water service area.

Community Development Partnership Program grants of up to $50,000 helped fund 28 projects ranging from providing vital equipment to first responders to updating community halls and parks to installing rainwater collection systems to help conserve water.

Ten projects will provide new protective gear or upgrade emergency response equipment for first responders. Other grants will help make the city park in Richland Springs safer; upgrade the aging heating and air-conditioning system at the Boys and Girls Club in DeWitt County; and improve Little League fields in Hallettsville, La Grange and Luling.

“The communities LCRA serves are the lifeblood of the region,” LCRA General Manager Phil Wilson said. “We are proud to partner with our wholesale electric customers to support these communities and help them continue to thrive. Many of these projects could not be completed without the grants, and it is our honor to help improve public safety and the quality of life for the communities in our service area.”

To date, LCRA and its wholesale electric customers have awarded 1,768 community grants totaling more than $46 million. When combined with nearly $226 million in community-raised matching funds, the program has invested almost $272 million in local communities.

Applications for the next round of Community Development Partnership Program grants will be available at lcra.org/cdpp on July 1 and are due by July 31.

The 28 grants awarded in the most recent grant cycle are:

  • ADAMSVILLE: A $20,240 grant from LCRA and Hamilton County Electric Cooperative for new rescue tools for the Adamsville Volunteer Fire Department.
  • BRADY: A $9,274 grant from LCRA and the City of Brady to the McCulloch County Library Association for a new rainwater collection system at the recently constructed library.
  • BRADY: A $3,000 grant from LCRA and the City of Brady for new signs for the McCulloch County Helping Hands resale store.
  • BRADY: A $4,975 grant from LCRA and the City of Brady for McCulloch County to buy automated external defibrillators to distribute to five volunteer fire departments in the county.
  • BURNET: A $25,000 grant from LCRA and Pedernales Electric Cooperative for a thermal imaging camera for the rescue boat at the East Lake Buchanan Volunteer Fire Department.
  • COLUMBUS: A $25,000 grant from LCRA to the Columbus Chamber of Commerce and Visitors Bureau for 60 electrical hookups to power downtown outdoor events.
  • COMFORT: A $39,600 grant from LCRA and Bandera Electric Cooperative to replace the worn-out roof at the Comfort Volunteer Fire Department.
  • CUERO: A $23,410 grant from LCRA and the City of Cuero to upgrade the aging heating and air-conditioning system at the Boys and Girls Club of DeWitt County.
  • DALE: A $25,000 grant from LCRA and Bluebonnet Electric Cooperative to help restore the nearly 145-year-old St. John Colony School, which will soon open as a historical museum in Caldwell County.
  • FREDERICKSBURG: A $1,717 grant from LCRA and the City of Fredericksburg to Friends of the Fredericksburg Nature Center, which will add an irrigation system and improve landscaping at Lady Bird Johnson Municipal Park.
  • FAYETTEVILLE: A $24,000 grant from LCRA and Bluebonnet Electric Cooperative to spruce up the SPJST Lodge No. 1 in Fayetteville.
  • HALLETTSVILLE: A $7,500 grant from LCRA and the City of Hallettsville for new, energy-efficient scoreboards for the Hallettsville Little League.
  • INDUSTRY: A $30,000 grant from LCRA and Bluebonnet Electric Cooperative for new hydraulic rescue tools and protective gear for the Industry Volunteer Fire Department.
  • INGRAM: A $4,962 grant from LCRA for new ventilation saws and medical kits for the Ingram Volunteer Fire Department.
  • LA GRANGE: A $10,000 grant from LCRA and the City of La Grange to the Texas Czech Heritage and Cultural Center to help replace the roof of the Sanford Schmid Ampitheater, a public venue used for events such as musicals, weddings and concerts.
  • LA GRANGE: An $8,300 grant from LCRA and the City of La Grange for new bronze signs at the Texas Quilt Museum.
  • LA GRANGE: A $20,000 grant from LCRA and the City of La Grange to La Grange Little League to renovate a baseball field at White Rock Park.
  • LINCOLN: A $19,893 grant from LCRA and Bluebonnet Electric Cooperative for a new system to refill firefighters’ air tanks for the Lincoln Volunteer Fire Department.
  • LULING: A $25,000 grant from LCRA and the City of Luling to upgrade three playing fields and install new safety netting at the Luling Little League baseball and softball complex.
  • LULING: A $50,000 grant from LCRA and the City of Luling to Play 1st, a community group that will use the funding to add energy-efficient lighting, new playground equipment and new picnic tables at Luling’s Longer Park.
  • MANOR: A $24,500 grant from LCRA and Bluebonnet Electric Cooperative for a 1-acre pond to collect rainwater and provide a habitat for migrating birds at Crowe’s Nest Farm in Manor.
  • MAXWELL: A $25,000 grant from LCRA and Bluebonnet Electric Cooperative for eight self-contained breathing units for the Maxwell Community Volunteer Fire Department.
  • PIPE CREEK: A $19,998 grant from LCRA and Bandera Electric Cooperative for an all-terrain vehicle the Pipe Creek Volunteer Fire Department can use for rescues and fighting fires in remote areas.
  • RICHLAND SPRINGS: A $9,600 grant from LCRA that will help the City of Richland Springs Beautification Committee buy new playground equipment and native landscaping for the city park.
  • ROSANKY: A $14,835 grant from LCRA and Bluebonnet Electric Cooperative to upgrade the Rosanky Community Center.
  • SMITHVILLE: A $22,900 grant from LCRA and the City of Smithville to the Lost Pines Artisans Alliance to replace a leaky roof and add a handicapped-accessible restroom at the Mary Nichols Arts Center.
  • SUNRISE BEACH: A $15,200 grant from LCRA for a new rainwater collection system that will capture water the Sunrise Beach Volunteer Fire Department can use in firefighting.
  • WARING: A $16,212 grant from LCRA and Bandera Electric Cooperative for new gear and swift-water rescue equipment for the Waring Volunteer Fire Department.

LCRA and its wholesale electric customers award CDPP grants for projects related to community planning, education, employment, health care, public safety, recreation and volunteer fire departments. Eligible organizations include volunteer fire departments, emergency responders, local governments, schools, libraries, civic groups, museums and other nonprofit organizations. For-profit entities, individuals, professional associations and nonprofits with limited group memberships are not eligible for CDPP grants.

About LCRA
The Lower Colorado River Authority serves customers and communities throughout Texas by managing the lower Colorado River; generating and transmitting electric power; providing a clean, reliable water supply; and offering outdoor adventures at more than 40 parks along the Colorado River from the Texas Hill Country to the Gulf Coast. LCRA and its employees are committed to fulfilling our mission to enhance the quality of life of the Texans we serve through water stewardship, energy and community service. LCRA was created by the Texas Legislature in 1934 and receives no state appropriations. For more information, visit lcra.org.

Media Contact
Clara Tuma
512–578–3292
clara.tuma@lcra.org







LCRA, Bluebonnet Co-op award $25,000 grant to upgrade St. John Colony School Museum

1 month 2 weeks ago

CALDWELL COUNTY, Texas – The St. John School Museum Board will be able to complete renovations on its nearly 145-year-old historic school building by adding restrooms, a new septic system and more, thanks to a $25,000 grant from the Lower Colorado River Authority and Bluebonnet Electric Cooperative.

The Community Development Partnership Program grant, along with $14,010 in matching contributions, will support the St. John School Restoration Project as it finishes renovations and opens the St. John School Museum housed in the former school building.

The museum will display artifacts and provide historical information about the St. John community, which was founded by freedmen in the 1870s. The grounds will provide a space for picnics, recreation and sports.

In addition to new restrooms and a septic system, the grant also will provide new fencing and additional storage space at the museum.

Board President Edna Rayford was a student at the school some 73 years ago. She began fundraising efforts three years ago to preserve the school for future generations.

“The school was closed down in 1963 or 1964 and it’s been sitting there all these years,’’ she said. “It was falling apart. The school is so important and it means so much to me. If we lose it there will be nothing left to tell our story.”

The museum will be used for educational tours, public outreach and community meetings. It will be open throughout the year upon request, including for the community’s annual Juneteenth celebration, which has drawn more than 1,000 visitors.

Rayford said there has been significant community interest in having the school restored and its historical significance documented and remembered.

“This grant is going to help us move a little faster to accomplish our goal,” she said. “This place has meant so much to the people who lived through that time.”

The community grant is one of 28 grants awarded recently through LCRA’s Community Development Partnership Program, which provides economic development and community assistance grants to cities, counties, volunteer fire departments, regional development councils and other nonprofit organizations in LCRA’s wholesale electric and water service areas. The program is part of LCRA’s effort to give back to the communities it serves. Bluebonnet Electric Cooperative is one of LCRA’s wholesale electric customers and a partner in the grant program.

Applications for the next round of grants will be accepted July 1-31. More information is available at lcra.org/cdpp.

About LCRA
The Lower Colorado River Authority serves customers and communities throughout Texas by managing the lower Colorado River; generating and transmitting electric power; providing a clean, reliable water supply; and offering outdoor adventures at more than 40 parks along the Colorado River from the Texas Hill Country to the Gulf Coast. LCRA and its employees are committed to fulfilling our mission to enhance the quality of life of the Texans we serve through water stewardship, energy and community service. LCRA was created by the Texas Legislature in 1934 and receives no state appropriations. For more information, visit lcra.org.

About Bluebonnet
Bluebonnet Electric Cooperative is one of the largest electric cooperatives in Texas and has been providing power to its members since 1939. Bluebonnet serves more than 105,000 meters, and owns and maintains 12,000 miles of power lines, located across more than 3,800 square miles within 14 Central Texas counties. Bluebonnet’s service area stretches from Travis County to Washington County, and from Milam County to Gonzales County. For more information about Bluebonnet Electric Cooperative, go to bluebonnet.coop and follow the co-op on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

Media Contacts
LCRA: Clara Tuma
512–578–3292
clara.tuma@lcra.org

Bluebonnet: Will Holford
512-332-7955
will.holford@bluebonnet.coop







LCRA, City of Brady award $3,000 grant to community resale store

1 month 2 weeks ago

BRADY, Texas – A $3,000 grant from the Lower Colorado River Authority and the City of Brady will help purchase needed signage for McCulloch Mercantile, a non-profit resale store that offers goods and services to residents of McCulloch County and the surrounding area.

Paired with matching funds of $715, the grant will enable the store in downtown Brady to erect an elevated pylon sign and a ground-level sign outside its building. The mercantile, which is operated by the non-profit McCulloch County Helping Hands, moved into the former county library building last November. The relocation has increased the scope of the store’s operations and its income, which is rolled back into the mercantile and Helping Hands charitable projects.

“We were thrilled to hear that we got the grant from LCRA,” said Ingrid McDonald, president of the Helping Hands board of directors. “These signs will tell everyone that we have a resale shop and that it benefits the community. It will put us on the map here.”

With the move into the former F.M. Richards Memorial Library building, the mercantile increased its available space from about 750 square feet to roughly 4,900. Before the start of the novel coronavirus pandemic, the store had added to its inventory as the number of donations and patrons jumped.

Christine Moseley, past president of the Helping Hands board, said the mercantile’s relocation “has allowed us to carry items we couldn’t before, such as furniture and baby furniture. The quality of the donations has gone up.”

The store is adjacent to the intersection of U.S. Highway 87 and U.S. Highway 377 in Brady.

“The pylon sign will be strategically placed so that when people are at that intersection, they will know there’s a thrift store in town,” Moseley said.

More sales at the mercantile would mean additional funds for Helping Hands services. Those include providing children with school supplies, offering financial assistance for rent and utilities, and various programs for seniors that range from help with filing a tax return to improving computer literacy.

“Funds are always needed, especially by non-profits, and to have LCRA support us in McCulloch County, I feel like it’s an honor,” Moseley said. “It’s not just the money, it’s the recognition of what we’re trying to do in McCulloch County for our residents in need.”

The community grant is one of 28 grants awarded recently through LCRA’s Community Development Partnership Program, which provides economic development and community assistance grants to cities, counties, volunteer fire departments, regional development councils and other nonprofit organizations in LCRA’s wholesale electric and water service areas. The program is part of LCRA’s effort to give back to the communities it serves. The City of Brady is one of LCRA’s wholesale electric customers and a partner in the grant program.

Applications for the next round of grants will be accepted July 1-31. More information is available at lcra.org/cdpp.

About LCRA
The Lower Colorado River Authority serves customers and communities throughout Texas by managing the lower Colorado River; generating and transmitting electric power; providing a clean, reliable water supply; and offering outdoor adventures at more than 40 parks along the Colorado River from the Texas Hill Country to the Gulf Coast. LCRA and its employees are committed to fulfilling our mission to enhance the quality of life of the Texans we serve through water stewardship, energy and community service. LCRA was created by the Texas Legislature in 1934 and receives no state appropriations. For more information, visit lcra.org.

Media Contact
Clara Tuma
512–578–3292
clara.tuma@lcra.org







LCRA, City of La Grange award $20,000 grant to renovate Little League field

1 month 2 weeks ago

LA GRANGE, Texas – The La Grange Little League will renovate the baseball field at White Rock Park to make important safety upgrades and prepare the field to host more teams, thanks to a $20,000 grant from the Lower Colorado River Authority and the City of La Grange.

The Community Development Partnership Program grant, along with $10,177 in matching funds, will enable the league to make improvements that will accommodate new divisions, enabling more teams to play at the field and providing recreational opportunities for additional young people. The grant will also help the league improve safety at the park by scraping and replacing the infield, closing in baselines to help with maintenance, and building up home plate to keep it from retaining water.

“We really want to get this done to benefit the kids and the community by having more teams come here to play,” said Eric Tillery, La Grange Little League president. “We are the second most populous league in Texas East District 13, which includes Little League programs from 13 leagues. We offer both baseball and softball for boys and girls.”

The La Grange Little League has an average enrollment of 400 youth in the spring, and about 250 in the fall.

Tillery said the field improvements will give the league two fields to play multiple divisions and potentially host all-star tournaments.

“We’re very appreciative to receive the grant,” Tillery said. “Without it, our goal to improve and expand the field would have been delayed. It would have taken us several more years to raise the money because we don’t have the budget to do it alone.”

The community grant is one of 28 grants awarded recently through LCRA’s Community Development Partnership Program, which provides economic development and community assistance grants to cities, counties, volunteer fire departments, regional development councils and other nonprofit organizations in LCRA’s wholesale electric and water service areas. The program is part of LCRA’s effort to give back to the communities it serves. The City of La Grange is one of LCRA’s wholesale electric customers and a partner in the grant program.

Applications for the next round of grants will be accepted July 1-31. More information is available at lcra.org/cdpp.

About LCRA
The Lower Colorado River Authority serves customers and communities throughout Texas by managing the lower Colorado River; generating and transmitting electric power; providing a clean, reliable water supply; and offering outdoor adventures at more than 40 parks along the Colorado River from the Texas Hill Country to the Gulf Coast. LCRA and its employees are committed to fulfilling our mission to enhance the quality of life of the Texans we serve through water stewardship, energy and community service. LCRA was created by the Texas Legislature in 1934 and receives no state appropriations. For more information, visit lcra.org.

Media Contact
Clara Tuma
512–578–3292
clara.tuma@lcra.org







LCRA awards $15,200 grant to help boost firefighting efforts in Llano County

1 month 2 weeks ago

LLANO COUNTY, Texas – A $15,200 grant from the Lower Colorado River Authority will enable the Sunrise Beach Volunteer Fire Department to purchase a rainwater collection system that will aid firefighting efforts.

The grant will be paired with matching funds of $6,898 provided by the department, which serves the residents of Sunrise Beach and neighboring communities in Llano County. The project will add a rainwater collection system to the 3,500-square-foot roof of Station No. 1 and funnel the rainwater it collects into a new 13,800-gallon storage tank. From there, the water will be transferred to firefighting vehicles as needed.

Jim Miller, past president of the Sunrise Beach VFD board, said an inch of rain will yield about 2,000 gallons of water for firefighting and training efforts. The department’s fleet includes two engines, a tanker and two brush trucks.

“I guess it was about two years ago when this idea popped into our heads,” Miller said. “Everybody’s excited about this grant from LCRA. We’re really wanting to get this project going.”

The new storage tank will hold a mix of about 40% collected rainwater and about 60% city-supplied water, Miller said. A higher-volume pump will refill the department’s trucks at the improved rate of 300 gallons per minute, which will mean firefighters can get on the road to emergencies more quickly.

Sunrise Beach VFD now uses water drawn from Lake LBJ and city-supplied water for firefighting. The addition of the rainwater collection system will reduce the department’s costs for treated city water and help conserve water in Lake LBJ, Miller said. 

By lowering its water usage costs, Sunrise Beach VFD can direct more money toward firefighting operations and supplies for first responders.

“This system will benefit us in mutual-aid situations,” said Miller, who’s also the chief of maintenance for Sunrise Beach VFD. “We’re going to have a constant, steady supply of water, and other nearby departments will be able to fill at the same place.”

The community grant is one of 28 grants awarded recently through LCRA’s Community Development Partnership Program, which provides economic development and community assistance grants to cities, counties, volunteer fire departments, regional development councils and other nonprofit organizations in LCRA’s wholesale electric and water service areas. The program is part of LCRA’s effort to give back to the communities it serves.

Applications for the next round of grants will be accepted July 1-31. More information is available at lcra.org/cdpp.

About LCRA
The Lower Colorado River Authority serves customers and communities throughout Texas by managing the lower Colorado River; generating and transmitting electric power; providing a clean, reliable water supply; and offering outdoor adventures at more than 40 parks along the Colorado River from the Texas Hill Country to the Gulf Coast. LCRA and its employees are committed to fulfilling our mission to enhance the quality of life of the Texans we serve through water stewardship, energy and community service. LCRA was created by the Texas Legislature in 1934 and receives no state appropriations. For more information, visit lcra.org.

Media Contact
Clara Tuma
512–578–3292
clara.tuma@lcra.org

LCRA, City of Fredericksburg award $1,717 grant to Friends of the Fredericksburg Nature Center

1 month 2 weeks ago

FREDERICKSBURG, Texas – Friends of the Fredericksburg Nature Center will add an irrigation system and improve landscaping in the bird viewing area at Lady Bird Johnson Municipal Park thanks to a $1,717 grant from the Lower Colorado River Authority and the City of Fredericksburg.

The Community Development Partnership Program grant, along with $9,500 in matching funds, will enable the center to install an irrigation system that will help support native trees and shrubs in the bird viewing area of the park.

“Our priority this year was to upgrade our bird viewing area,” said Mary Ellen Terrell, board treasurer at Friends of the Fredericksburg Nature Center. “We added a large waterfall feature that is attracting birds we normally don’t see because they like the running water.”

The park is also attracting more guests as visitors to the historic town of Fredericksburg look to get outdoors and enjoy nature, Terrell said.

The bird viewing area is a popular stop along the park’s nature trail system, providing a place for visitors to watch and photograph birds. Signs within the bird blind provide information on bird identification and suggest ways visitors can create bird habitats on their own properties.

The center’s trails and nature stops are accessible every day at no cost to the public.

"We're really excited about the grant," Terrell said. "Because we're a volunteer organization, we rely on membership donations for all our projects. The LCRA grant will help us progress more quickly than we would have been able to without it."

The community grant is one of 28 grants awarded recently through LCRA’s Community Development Partnership Program, which provides economic development and community assistance grants to cities, counties, volunteer fire departments, regional development councils and other nonprofit organizations in LCRA’s wholesale electric and water service areas. The program is part of LCRA’s effort to give back to the communities it serves. The City of Fredericksburg is one of LCRA’s wholesale electric customers and a partner in the grant program.

Applications for the next round of grants will be accepted July 1-31. More information is available at lcra.org/cdpp.

About LCRA
The Lower Colorado River Authority serves customers and communities throughout Texas by managing the lower Colorado River; generating and transmitting electric power; providing a clean, reliable water supply; and offering outdoor adventures at more than 40 parks along the Colorado River from the Texas Hill Country to the Gulf Coast. LCRA and its employees are committed to fulfilling our mission to enhance the quality of life of the Texans we serve through water stewardship, energy and community service. LCRA was created by the Texas Legislature in 1934 and receives no state appropriations. For more information, visit lcra.org.

Media Contact
Clara Tuma
512–578–3292
clara.tuma@lcra.org







LCRA, City of Smithville award $22,900 grant for improvements at arts center

1 month 2 weeks ago

SMITHVILLE, Texas – A $22,900 grant from the Lower Colorado River Authority and the City of Smithville will help the Lost Pines Artisans Alliance replace a leaky roof, add a handicapped-accessible restroom and upgrade the kitchen at the Mary Nichols Arts Center, which houses the organization.

The grant, along with matching funds of $5,600, will pay for improvements to the historic Nichols House. Built in the early 1900s, the house was deeded to Smithville in 1992 for the creation of the Mary Nichols Arts Center. The Lost Pines Artisans Alliance maintains the property as an arts-focused community center, offering studio and gallery space and workshops related to visual arts, music and other forms of artistic expression.

Along with repairs to the roof, the improvements will include renovating the center’s restroom to make it comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act and upgrading the adjacent kitchen.­­­

Smithville City Manager Robert Tamble said the improvements will help make the Mary Nichols Arts Center “a truly polished jewel” within the city’s Richard D. Latham Cultural District, while also aiding Smithville’s efforts to boost tourism and commerce.

“The timing could not have been better for LCRA to sweep in to help us restore this beautiful, historic home,” Tamble said.

Brandy Royster, a professional artist and president of the LPAA, said the group was ecstatic to hear it had received the grant.

“The Mary Nichols Arts Center is a wonderful historic building with so much potential, but as with many older properties, it needed some repairs to keep it functional,” she said. “Up until now, we could not afford those repairs.”

With funds secured for the renovations, Royster said, the Lost Pines Arts Alliance will be able to move ahead with projects that include a new pottery studio, music lessons and a recording studio where local singers and songwriters can collaborate on an album.

“We are so excited to be able to look forward to finishing these repairs and getting back to what we do best: creating and sharing art,” Royster said.

The community grant is one of 28 grants awarded recently through LCRA’s Community Development Partnership Program, which provides economic development and community assistance grants to cities, counties, volunteer fire departments, regional development councils and other nonprofit organizations in LCRA’s wholesale electric and water service areas. The program is part of LCRA’s effort to give back to the communities it serves. The City of Smithville is one of LCRA’s wholesale electric customers and a partner in the grant program.

Applications for the next round of grants will be accepted July 1-31. More information is available at lcra.org/cdpp.

About LCRA
The Lower Colorado River Authority serves customers and communities throughout Texas by managing the lower Colorado River; generating and transmitting electric power; providing a clean, reliable water supply; and offering outdoor adventures at more than 40 parks along the Colorado River from the Texas Hill Country to the Gulf Coast. LCRA and its employees are committed to fulfilling our mission to enhance the quality of life of the Texans we serve through water stewardship, energy and community service. LCRA was created by the Texas Legislature in 1934 and receives no state appropriations. For more information, visit lcra.org.

Media Contact
Clara Tuma
512–578–3292
clara.tuma@lcra.org







LCRA, City of La Grange award $8,300 grant to Texas Quilt Museum

1 month 3 weeks ago

LA GRANGE, Texas – An $8,300 grant from the Lower Colorado River Authority and the City of La Grange will help the Texas Quilt Museum replace deteriorating signage throughout its 19th-century period garden on the square in downtown La Grange.

The Community Development Partnership Program grant, along with $6,700 in matching funds, will help purchase and install new bronze signs for the period garden known as Grandmother’s Flower Garden, which is named after a quilt pattern and is home to a number of plants that grew in the Fayette County area in the 19th century.

“The garden is an integral part of the museum and is one of only a handful of period gardens in Texas,” said Julie Maffei, manager at the Texas Quilt Museum. “There is a close connection between gardening and quilting, which can be seen in the design of the garden and the design in quilts.”

The garden is open to the public and is a popular site for group outdoor luncheons and quiet reflections, as well providing a scenic spot for family, wedding and birthday photographs. The garden also features a large hand-painted mural of quilts by artist Brent McCarthy of New Braunfels.

Since opening in 2011, the museum has attracted over 60,000 people from 58 countries around the world to La Grange. Maffei said the new signage will replace several aging signs that are deteriorating due to exposure to rain, sun, wind and storms. The signs that will be replaced include a welcome sign, a brief description of a typical 19th-century garden and its ties to quilting, and an explanation on how the sundial in the middle of the garden works.

“We’re thrilled and honored to receive this grant from LCRA because this is an important project and is good for the community,” Maffei said. “We only want to do this once and new signage will help improve the overall look of the garden, which is a gem to this community.”

The community grant is one of 28 grants awarded recently through LCRA’s Community Development Partnership Program, which provides economic development and community assistance grants to cities, counties, volunteer fire departments, regional development councils and other nonprofit organizations in LCRA’s wholesale electric and water service areas. The program is part of LCRA’s effort to give back to the communities it serves. The City of La Grange is one of LCRA’s wholesale electric customers and a partner in the grant program.

Applications for the next round of grants will be accepted July 1-31. More information is available at lcra.org/cdpp.

About LCRA
The Lower Colorado River Authority serves customers and communities throughout Texas by managing the lower Colorado River; generating and transmitting electric power; providing a clean, reliable water supply; and offering outdoor adventures at more than 40 parks along the Colorado River from the Texas Hill Country to the Gulf Coast. LCRA and its employees are committed to fulfilling our mission to enhance the quality of life of the Texans we serve through water stewardship, energy and community service. LCRA was created by the Texas Legislature in 1934 and receives no state appropriations. For more information, visit lcra.org.

Media Contact
Clara Tuma
512–578–3292
clara.tuma@lcra.org







LCRA grant will help power efforts to bring more public events to downtown Columbus

1 month 3 weeks ago

COLUMBUS, Texas – A $25,000 grant from the Lower Colorado River Authority will help provide 60 more electrical hookups on the historic Colorado County Courthouse square, providing the opportunity for larger and more outdoor events in downtown Columbus.

The grant, paired with $28,350 in matching funds, will add five secured power hubs, each containing 12 electric outlets, on the courthouse square.

“We’re putting in all of the wiring underground, and the hubs will be in five different spots and have steel plates that cover and secure them,” said Billy Kahn, executive director of the Columbus Chamber of Commerce and Visitors Bureau. “It’s really cool: a portable power base that will be used for approved events on the square.”

With more electricity available to safely power events, Kahn said he envisions expanded farmers markets and arts and crafts festivals on the courthouse square, along with the addition of outdoor fitness classes and the possible return of the Western history-themed Columbus Folk Fest.

“The goal is to provide more electricity for anything you want to do,” Kahn said. “People often talk about having a movie night on the square, with a large projection screen. That requires a lot of power and that power will now be there.”

The availability of the additional outlets also will eliminate the need for noisy portable power generators and the maze of extension cords winding 50 to 100 feet around the square, Kahn said.

At the center of the project will be the Colorado County Courthouse, which was completed in 1891 and recently underwent a $5 million renovation thanks to a grant from the Texas Historical Commission. The courthouse is included in the National Register of Historic Places and features a copper dome that replaced a bell tower destroyed by a 1909 hurricane.

“What makes me happiest about this project is it’s a joint effort that the city, the county, the chamber alone could not have afforded, but with the help of LCRA, we were able to get these other stakeholders onboard,” Kahn said. “It just warms my heart to see everyone coming together to make this happen.”

The community grant is one of 28 grants awarded recently through LCRA’s Community Development Partnership Program, which provides economic development and community assistance grants to cities, counties, volunteer fire departments, regional development councils and other nonprofit organizations in LCRA’s wholesale electric and water service areas. The program is part of LCRA’s effort to give back to the communities it serves.

Applications for the next round of grants will be accepted July 1-31. More information is available at lcra.org/cdpp.

About LCRA
The Lower Colorado River Authority serves customers and communities throughout Texas by managing the lower Colorado River; generating and transmitting electric power; providing a clean, reliable water supply; and offering outdoor adventures at more than 40 parks along the Colorado River from the Texas Hill Country to the Gulf Coast. LCRA and its employees are committed to fulfilling our mission to enhance the quality of life of the Texans we serve through water stewardship, energy and community service. LCRA was created by the Texas Legislature in 1934 and receives no state appropriations. For more information, visit lcra.org.

Media Contact
Clara Tuma
512–578–3292
clara.tuma@lcra.org







LCRA, Bluebonnet Co-op award $24,500 grant for Crowe’s Nest Farm educational exhibit

1 month 3 weeks ago

MANOR, Texas – A $24,500 grant from the Lower Colorado River Authority and Bluebonnet Electric Cooperative will help Crowe’s Nest Farm construct a 1-acre pond to collect water and provide a habitat for migrating waterfowl.

The grant, along with $10,500 in matching funds, will help build the water capture pond, which also will provide a wetlands habitat educational exhibit for the tens of thousands of school children who visit the farm annually.

In order to keep the pond healthy, the water will be aerated by a windmill and solar-powered pump, and native Texas plants will protect the north side of the pond from northern winds.

“The low runoff area is perfect to capture water from rains, but we have never had enough funds to complete the project,” said David Williams, Crowe’s Nest Farm executive director. “Until now, the area was just a grassy bowl that never held water. Thanks to this grant, we can re-dig, seal and complete the pond.”

Currently, the 90-acre farm has no way to capture and conserve rainwater or runoff. The pond will not only be a valuable educational tool, but also will serve as a critical water source for migrating waterfowl.

“We are smack dab in the middle of a major migratory path of many species of birds that pass through every year,” Williams said. “We have observed numerous native species on the farm, and the pond will attract and provide for even more birds and waterfowl.”

With the Manor and Austin areas rapidly growing, attendance is increasing at the farm as interest in outdoor education experiences grows. About 40,000 school children visit the farm annually.

“We are very excited about this project,” Williams said. “It has been badly needed for 22 years.”

The community grant is one of 28 grants recently awarded through LCRA’s Community Development Partnership Program, which provides economic development and community assistance grants to cities, counties, volunteer fire departments, regional development councils and other nonprofit organizations in LCRA’s wholesale electric and water service areas. The program is part of LCRA’s effort to give back to the communities it serves. Bluebonnet Electric Cooperative is one of LCRA’s wholesale electric customers and a partner in the grant program.

Applications for the next round of grants will be accepted July 1-31. More information is available at lcra.org/cdpp.

About LCRA
The Lower Colorado River Authority serves customers and communities throughout Texas by managing the lower Colorado River; generating and transmitting electric power; providing a clean, reliable water supply; and offering outdoor adventures at more than 40 parks along the Colorado River from the Texas Hill Country to the Gulf Coast. LCRA and its employees are committed to fulfilling our mission to enhance the quality of life of the Texans we serve through water stewardship, energy and community service. LCRA was created by the Texas Legislature in 1934 and receives no state appropriations. For more information, visit lcra.org.

About Bluebonnet
Bluebonnet Electric Cooperative is one of the largest electric cooperatives in Texas and has been providing power to its members since 1939. Bluebonnet serves more than 105,000 meters, and owns and maintains 12,000 miles of power lines, located across more than 3,800 square miles within 14 Central Texas counties. Bluebonnet’s service area stretches from Travis County to Washington County, and from Milam County to Gonzales County. For more information about Bluebonnet Electric Cooperative, go to bluebonnet.coop and follow the co-op on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

Media Contacts
LCRA: Clara Tuma
512–578–3292
clara.tuma@lcra.org

Bluebonnet: Will Holford
512-332-7955
will.holford@bluebonnet.coop







LCRA, Bandera Electric Co-op award $16,212 grant for new emergency equipment

1 month 3 weeks ago

KENDALL COUNTY, Texas – A $16,212 grant from the Lower Colorado River Authority and Bandera Electric Cooperative will provide the Waring Volunteer Fire Department with new bunker gear and swift-water rescue equipment.

This grant, combined with $4,100 in matching funds from the department, will help replace worn-out gear and equipment, increasing firefighter safety and providing better equipment for fire and water rescue operations in the community.

“Bunker gear is the basic gear that a firefighter wears,” VFD President Michelle Achorn said. “We have quite a few members who have been in the department for a long time and have older gear. Giving senior members new gear moves us toward our goal of protecting them better, and we’re excited to get to replace it sooner than expected.”

When the area experiences flooding, the department assists with rescuing stranded motorists and transporting supplies and medicine to otherwise-inaccessible areas, in addition to responding to other emergencies, Achorn said.

“Our county experiences a very high incidence of flash floods,” Achorn said. “We are right on the Guadalupe River, and a lot of times the river completely floods the bridges or low water crossings. This grant will give us a chance to get our equipment upgraded before the next flood season.”

Members of the Waring department also assist Kendall County Emergency Medical Services and surrounding fire departments through mutual aid agreements.

“Waring VFD covers almost 44 square miles and serves more than 3,500 residents,’’ Achorn said. “The township of Waring has about 80 residents in a 12-block area that includes a historic one-room schoolhouse, an old church, several small shops, an event center and the firehouse complex. The surrounding area is rich with farming and ranching families.

“We hugely appreciate all of the support LCRA has given departments across the region, not only ours,’’ she said. “It is really helpful to our communities as a whole, and we couldn’t do our part without support like this from LCRA and Bandera Electric Co-op.’’

The community grant is one of 28 grants awarded recently through LCRA’s Community Development Partnership Program, which provides economic development and community assistance grants to cities, counties, volunteer fire departments, regional development councils and other nonprofit organizations in LCRA’s wholesale electric and water service areas. The program is part of LCRA’s effort to give back to the communities it serves. Bandera Electric Cooperative is one of LCRA’s wholesale electric customers and a partner in the grant program.

Applications for the next round of grants will be accepted July 1-31. More information is available at lcra.org/cdpp.

About LCRA
The Lower Colorado River Authority serves customers and communities throughout Texas by managing the lower Colorado River; generating and transmitting electric power; providing a clean, reliable water supply; and offering outdoor adventures at more than 40 parks along the Colorado River from the Texas Hill Country to the Gulf Coast. LCRA and its employees are committed to fulfilling our mission to enhance the quality of life of the Texans we serve through water stewardship, energy and community service. LCRA was created by the Texas Legislature in 1934 and receives no state appropriations. For more information, visit lcra.org.

Media Contact
Clara Tuma
512–578–3292
clara.tuma@lcra.org






LCRA, Bluebonnet Co-op award $25,000 grant to Maxwell Fire Department

1 month 3 weeks ago

CALDWELL COUNTY, Texas – A $25,000 grant from the Lower Colorado River Authority and Bluebonnet Electric Cooperative will help the Maxwell Community Volunteer Fire Department purchase new emergency gear for its firefighters.

The Community Development Partnership Program grant, along with $17,615 in matching funds, will allow the department to buy eight self-contained breathing apparatus systems, which provide firefighters with breathable air when responding to emergencies. The new equipment will replace the department’s 15-year-old equipment.

“It was getting kind of scary knowing they could fail us,” said Fire Chief David Childress. “They’re in compliance, but they tend to have problems, and now with the new equipment we can be more efficient.”

Maxwell VFD has 20 members who provide emergency services to Caldwell County Emergency Services District 2, which has a population of 7,500 people. They also provide mutual emergency assistance to Caldwell County’s 11 fire departments.

“We’re excited about this grant because it’s going to help us out tremendously,” Childress said. “We wouldn’t have been able get them without the funding. The new equipment will not only help us, but other volunteer departments in the area, and improve the response capability in the region.”

The community grant is one of 28 grants awarded recently through LCRA’s Community Development Partnership Program, which provides economic development and community assistance grants to cities, counties, volunteer fire departments, regional development councils and other nonprofit organizations in LCRA’s wholesale electric and water service areas. The program is part of LCRA’s effort to give back to the communities it serves. Bluebonnet Electric Cooperative is one of LCRA’s wholesale electric customers and a partner in the grant program.

Applications for the next round of grants will be accepted July 1-31. More information is available at lcra.org/cdpp.

About LCRA
The Lower Colorado River Authority serves customers and communities throughout Texas by managing the lower Colorado River; generating and transmitting electric power; providing a clean, reliable water supply; and offering outdoor adventures at more than 40 parks along the Colorado River from the Texas Hill Country to the Gulf Coast. LCRA and its employees are committed to fulfilling our mission to enhance the quality of life of the Texans we serve through water stewardship, energy and community service. LCRA was created by the Texas Legislature in 1934 and receives no state appropriations. For more information, visit lcra.org.

About Bluebonnet
Bluebonnet Electric Cooperative is one of the largest electric cooperatives in Texas and has been providing power to its members since 1939. Bluebonnet serves more than 105,000 meters, and owns and maintains 12,000 miles of power lines, located across more than 3,800 square miles within 14 Central Texas counties. Bluebonnet’s service area stretches from Travis County to Washington County, and from Milam County to Gonzales County. For more information about Bluebonnet Electric Cooperative, go to bluebonnet.coop and follow the co-op on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

Media Contacts
LCRA: Clara Tuma
512–578–3292
clara.tuma@lcra.org

Bluebonnet: Will Holford
512-332-7955
will.holford@bluebonnet.coop







LCRA awards $9,600 grant to upgrade Richland Springs City Park

1 month 3 weeks ago

SAN SABA COUNTY, Texas – Richland Springs City Park will receive new playground equipment and native landscaping, thanks to a $9,600 grant from the Lower Colorado River Authority. The Community Development Partnership Program grant, along with $2,400 in matching funds, will enable the City of Richland Springs Beautification Committee to replace rusty and dangerous playground equipment and add native landscaping and flowering plants in the park.

“We are thrilled to be able to update our city park with the generous funds from LCRA,” said Paige Moats, president of beautification committee. “The current equipment, which is probably about 50 years old, is dangerous and outdated. The new equipment, along with natural shade and landscaping, will greatly enhance the use of the park and enjoyment of our residents.”

The park provides a safe, fun place for visitors to exercise, play and congregate. Richland Springs has a population of about 350, and the surrounding communities have a population of about 3,000 people.

The park sits on a major highway and is the most visible attraction in Richland Springs. It’s the site for the city’s annual Fourth of July festival, which often draws large crowds from San Saba and surrounding counties.

Moats said the beautification committee plans to add trees or a shade structure, as well as plant hummingbird- and butterfly-attracting plants in the park’s existing raised plant beds.

“The park was created in 1998 with a grant from LCRA, but hasn't been updated since,” Moats said. “If we hadn't received the grant, our park would continue to decline and be dangerous and unappealing.”

The community grant is one of 28 grants awarded recently through LCRA’s Community Development Partnership Program, which provides economic development and community assistance grants to cities, counties, volunteer fire departments, regional development councils and other nonprofit organizations in LCRA’s wholesale electric and water service areas. The program is part of LCRA’s effort to give back to the communities it serves.

Applications for the next round of grants will be accepted July 1-31. More information is available at lcra.org/cdpp.

About LCRA
The Lower Colorado River Authority serves customers and communities throughout Texas by managing the lower Colorado River; generating and transmitting electric power; providing a clean, reliable water supply; and offering outdoor adventures at more than 40 parks along the Colorado River from the Texas Hill Country to the Gulf Coast. LCRA and its employees are committed to fulfilling our mission to enhance the quality of life of the Texans we serve through water stewardship, energy and community service. LCRA was created by the Texas Legislature in 1934 and receives no state appropriations. For more information, visit lcra.org.

Media Contact
Clara Tuma
512–578–3292
clara.tuma@lcra.org







LCRA, Bandera Electric Co-op award $39,600 grant to upgrade Comfort fire station

1 month 3 weeks ago

KENDALL COUNTY, Texas – The Comfort Volunteer Fire Department will replace its station’s worn-out roof thanks to a $39,600 grant from the Lower Colorado River Authority and Bandera Electric Cooperative.

The Community Development Partnership Program grant, along with $9,900 in matching contributions, will allow the department to install a new roof to help safeguard multiple fire trucks, engines and other emergency equipment, as well as communication and office equipment.

“The facility and metal roof are 25 years old and the roof has run its course,” said Bruce McNabb, department secretary. “It has damage from normal wear and tear and it leaks. It’s time for a new roof.”

Comfort VFD serves an area with a population between 5,000 to 6,000 people in western Kendall and eastern Kerr counties.

The fire station serves as the emergency management site for western Kendall County and is the site for the community’s annual Good Friday Fish Fry, trick-or-treaters and antique car shows. 

“We are thrilled to get this grant,” McNabb said. “The firehouse is the center point of the whole community. Being able to present a newly improved facility that will help protect our equipment is very important.”

The community grant is one of 28 grants awarded recently through LCRA’s Community Development Partnership Program, which provides economic development and community assistance grants to cities, counties, volunteer fire departments, regional development councils and other nonprofit organizations in LCRA’s wholesale electric and water service areas. The program is part of LCRA’s effort to give back to the communities it serves. Bandera Electric Cooperative is one of LCRA’s wholesale electric customers and a partner in the grant program.

Applications for the next round of grants will be accepted July 1-31. More information is available at lcra.org/cdpp.

About LCRA
The Lower Colorado River Authority serves customers and communities throughout Texas by managing the lower Colorado River; generating and transmitting electric power; providing a clean, reliable water supply; and offering outdoor adventures at more than 40 parks along the Colorado River from the Texas Hill Country to the Gulf Coast. LCRA and its employees are committed to fulfilling our mission to enhance the quality of life of the Texans we serve through water stewardship, energy and community service. LCRA was created by the Texas Legislature in 1934 and receives no state appropriations. For more information, visit lcra.org.

Media Contact
Clara Tuma
512–578–3292
clara.tuma@lcra.org

LCRA, Bluebonnet Co-op award $30,000 grant for rescue tools, firefighting gear

1 month 3 weeks ago

AUSTIN COUNTY, Texas – A $30,000 grant from the Lower Colorado River Authority and Bluebonnet Electric Cooperative will help the Industry Volunteer Fire Department purchase two much-needed pieces of equipment: new and improved hydraulic rescue tools to extract crash victims from vehicles and new protective gear for firefighters.

The grant will be paired with matching funds of $12,874 from the Industry VFD, which serves approximately 2,000 people in northwest Austin County. The department’s 54.5-square-mile service area includes Industry, a farming community situated about halfway between Austin and Houston.

Michael Drab, vice president of the Industry VFD board, said the department has been using an old set of extraction tools that sometimes aren’t effective on the stronger materials used in newer cars and trucks. On occasion, Industry VFD first responders have had to request aid at crash scenes from other departments, he said.

“With these new tools, we’ll be able to extract someone from a vehicle more safely and more quickly,” Drab said. “We’re very grateful to receive this grant from LCRA and Bluebonnet. At the end of the day, it’s going to help us to better serve the community.”

The two additional self-contained breathing apparatuses (SCBAs) will supply oxygen, filter out carbon dioxide and keep firefighters from inhaling noxious fumes during emergencies, he said.

“We don’t want to be putting firefighters’ health at risk,” Drab said. “By adding additional SCBAs, we can protect more firefighters when we’re at scenes and allow them to be better equipped for rescue and fire suppression duties.”

The community grant is one of 28 grants awarded recently through LCRA’s Community Development Partnership Program, which provides economic development and community assistance grants to cities, counties, volunteer fire departments, regional development councils and other nonprofit organizations in LCRA’s wholesale electric and water service areas. The program is part of LCRA’s effort to give back to the communities it serves. Bluebonnet Electric Cooperative is one of LCRA’s wholesale electric customers and a partner in the grant program.

Applications for the next round of grants will be accepted July 1-31. More information is available at lcra.org/cdpp.

About LCRA
The Lower Colorado River Authority serves customers and communities throughout Texas by managing the lower Colorado River; generating and transmitting electric power; providing a clean, reliable water supply; and offering outdoor adventures at more than 40 parks along the Colorado River from the Texas Hill Country to the Gulf Coast. LCRA and its employees are committed to fulfilling our mission to enhance the quality of life of the Texans we serve through water stewardship, energy and community service. LCRA was created by the Texas Legislature in 1934 and receives no state appropriations. For more information, visit lcra.org.

About Bluebonnet
Bluebonnet Electric Cooperative is one of the largest electric cooperatives in Texas and has been providing power to its members since 1939. Bluebonnet serves more than 105,000 meters, and owns and maintains 12,000 miles of power lines, located across more than 3,800 square miles within 14 Central Texas counties. Bluebonnet’s service area stretches from Travis County to Washington County, and from Milam County to Gonzales County. For more information about Bluebonnet Electric Cooperative, go to bluebonnet.coop and follow the co-op on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

Media Contacts
LCRA: Clara Tuma
512–578–3292
clara.tuma@lcra.org

Bluebonnet: Will Holford
512-332-7955
will.holford@bluebonnet.coop







LCRA, City of Luling award $25,000 grant to upgrade Luling Little League fields

1 month 3 weeks ago

LULING, Texas – A $25,000 grant from the Lower Colorado River Authority and the City of Luling will help support a nearly quarter million dollar project to upgrade the baseball and softball complex used by Luling Little League.

Paired with matching funds of $212,500, the grant will pay for renovations to three playing fields, the installation of new safety netting to protect fans, the creation of a bullpen for pitchers and upgrades to warmup facilities.

Founded in 1974, Luling Little League offers instruction and competition in baseball and softball for players ages 4 to 16.

“This grant helps tremendously,” said Joshua Kimball, Luling Little League president. “Our league and our board members were super excited because it’s another one of our wish-list items, and we’re getting it completed for the kids.”

Kimball said the work will improve the turf and base paths that have become worn and uneven since the complex was completed at Edgar B. Davis Northside Park in 2001. The two fields used by younger athletes measure about 10,000 square feet apiece. The third field is used by high school-age players and covers about 19,000 square feet.

“We’ll take out all the grass, down to the roots, then add dirt and re-level it,” Kimball said. “Then we can start coming back with new sod and new dirt for the infields.”

The new safety netting will safeguard spectators watching games at the three fields and people visiting the concession stand.

“The new safety netting means a lot,” Kimball said. “You have grandparents who come to watch the games, and this netting will protect people who are sitting in the bleachers.”

Kimball said the improvements will help Luling Little League stage higher-level tournaments at the complex while also boosting the area’s economy.

“This will help us to host district tournaments and regional tournaments,” he said. “We’ll be able to pull teams from all over the state of Texas, possibly New Mexico and Louisiana, too.”

The community grant is one of 28 grants awarded recently through LCRA’s Community Development Partnership Program, which provides economic development and community assistance grants to cities, counties, volunteer fire departments, regional development councils and other nonprofit organizations in LCRA’s wholesale electric and water service areas. The program is part of LCRA’s effort to give back to the communities it serves. The City of Luling is one of LCRA’s wholesale electric customers and a partner in the grant program.

Applications for the next round of grants will be accepted July 1-31. More information is available at lcra.org/cdpp.

About LCRA
The Lower Colorado River Authority serves customers and communities throughout Texas by managing the lower Colorado River; generating and transmitting electric power; providing a clean, reliable water supply; and offering outdoor adventures at more than 40 parks along the Colorado River from the Texas Hill Country to the Gulf Coast. LCRA and its employees are committed to fulfilling our mission to enhance the quality of life of the Texans we serve through water stewardship, energy and community service. LCRA was created by the Texas Legislature in 1934 and receives no state appropriations. For more information, visit lcra.org.

Media Contact
Clara Tuma
512–578–3292
clara.tuma@lcra.org







LCRA, Hamilton County Electric Co-op award $20,240 grant for emergency response tools

1 month 3 weeks ago

LAMPASAS COUNTY, Texas – A $20,240 grant from the Lower Colorado River Authority and Hamilton County Electric Cooperative will help the Adamsville Volunteer Fire Department purchase new rescue tools to help firefighters responding to car crashes and rural house fires.

This grant, combined with $5,200 in matching funds from the department, will assist the volunteer fire department in upgrading its current hydraulic extractor to a cordless version to help firefighters assist victims in hard-to-reach areas.

“We’re in a very remote area,’’ said Sharon Watson, VFD treasurer. “A lot of these ditches where the accidents are occurring can’t be easily reached. We’re the only fire department in our county that’s not in a city, so if a vehicle is on fire, it could be the difference between life and death. It takes the Lampasas Fire Department about 30 minutes to get out there.”

In addition to the cordless extractor, the department will purchase a cordless ram and exhaust fan to clear out smoke during house fires, when firefighter visibility is impaired. Having tools like these readily available is essential to the department as the community continues to grow, Watson said.

“Our community should know their department has the right equipment to help them,” Watson said.

The Adamsville department, one of four fire departments in Lampasas County, serves a growing rural population.

The community grant is one of 28 grants awarded recently through LCRA’s Community Development Partnership Program, which provides economic development and community assistance grants to cities, counties, volunteer fire departments, regional development councils and other nonprofit organizations in LCRA’s wholesale electric and water service areas. The program is part of LCRA’s effort to give back to the communities it serves. Hamilton County Electric Cooperative is one of LCRA’s wholesale electric customers and a partner in the grant program.

Applications for the next round of grants will be accepted July 1-31. More information is available at lcra.org/cdpp.

About LCRA
The Lower Colorado River Authority serves customers and communities throughout Texas by managing the lower Colorado River; generating and transmitting electric power; providing a clean, reliable water supply; and offering outdoor adventures at more than 40 parks along the Colorado River from the Texas Hill Country to the Gulf Coast. LCRA and its employees are committed to fulfilling our mission to enhance the quality of life of the Texans we serve through water stewardship, energy and community service. LCRA was created by the Texas Legislature in 1934 and receives no state appropriations. For more information, visit lcra.org.

Media Contact
Clara Tuma
512–578–3292
clara.tuma@lcra.org







LCRA, City of La Grange award $10,000 grant to Texas Czech Heritage and Cultural Center

1 month 3 weeks ago

LA GRANGE, Texas – The Texas Czech Heritage and Cultural Center will replace the aging roof of a popular amphitheater, thanks to a $10,000 grant from the Lower Colorado River Authority and the City of La Grange.

The Community Development Partnership Program grant, along with $22,125 in matching funds, will help replace the 20-year-old roof atop the Sanford Schmid Amphitheater.

“We really appreciate the grant and look forward to getting this project underway,” said Retta Chandler, Texas Czech Heritage and Cultural Center president. “Although the building is not old, it is very special. It was designed in the European style that is very important to the Czech culture.”

The entire roof is worn, Chandler said, and a replacement is essential to protecting the amphitheater’s integrity and visitor safety. The amphitheater is available to the public for an array of events, including musicals, weddings and concerts. Visitors can also explore the amphitheater when touring the cultural center.

“The stadium can hold up to 400 seats, plus the grassy area behind us can accommodate up to 1,000 people,” Chandler said. “We want the community to enjoy the beauty of the amphitheater and the special events it hosts, like the Czech Heritage Festival, which draws between 400 to 500 people.”

The community grant is one of 28 grants awarded recently through LCRA’s Community Development Partnership Program, which provides economic development and community assistance grants to cities, counties, volunteer fire departments, regional development councils and other nonprofit organizations in LCRA’s wholesale electric and water service areas. The program is part of LCRA’s effort to give back to the communities it serves. The City of La Grange is one of LCRA’s wholesale electric customers and a partner in the grant program.

Applications for the next round of grants will be accepted July 1-31. More information is available at lcra.org/cdpp.

About LCRA
The Lower Colorado River Authority serves customers and communities throughout Texas by managing the lower Colorado River; generating and transmitting electric power; providing a clean, reliable water supply; and offering outdoor adventures at more than 40 parks along the Colorado River from the Texas Hill Country to the Gulf Coast. LCRA and its employees are committed to fulfilling our mission to enhance the quality of life of the Texans we serve through water stewardship, energy and community service. LCRA was created by the Texas Legislature in 1934 and receives no state appropriations. For more information, visit lcra.org.

Media Contact
Clara Tuma
512–578–3292
clara.tuma@lcra.org







Checked
20 minutes 46 seconds ago
Lower Colorado River Authority (TX) News
Get the latest news about LCRA.
Subscribe to Lower Colorado River Authority (TX) News feed
Aggregator Taxonomy